DayBreaks for 2/22/19 – I AM #8: The Bread of Life

Image result for bread

DayBreaks for 2/22/2019: I AM #8: The Bread of Life

John 6:35 (CSBBible) – I am the bread of life,” Jesus told them. “No one who comes to me will ever be hungry, and no one who believes in me will ever be thirsty again.

Bread (symbolically representative of food to the people of Jesus’ day) is that which is necessary for life to go on. But elsewhere Jesus tells us in John 17:3 that to know God and Jesus is life with a twist – it is eternal. So, there is existence inherent in life – but there is much more. There is relationship with the Creator. When Jesus claimed to be the bread of life, it is true that the very food we eat this gives us existence comes from his provision, but there is more to the life that comes from this “bread” than just existing. That hardly qualifies to be life. Stones exist – but they don’t have life.

So it is with the bread of life. We can either just exist by not knowing God, or we can take in the bread of heaven that came down from above and in doing so, we have a new life that is primarily defined by knowing God and Christ Jesus whom he sent. Without Jesus there is existence, but no relationship. With Jesus, we have both. It is that relationship that on the last day when all shall end that will keep us secure and safe.

We need daily bread. Sure, we can survive for a while without it, but not indefinitely. How long has it been since you have taken in the bread of life and really devoured it? Why would you rob yourself of the life it gives?

“Take and eat.”

PRAYER: Lord, thank you for providing the bread that not only feeds our mouths but our hearts and souls. Fill us so we are never hungry again! In Jesus’ name, Amen.  

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

Advertisements

DayBreaks for 2/13/19 – I AM #3: The Life

Image result for life

DayBreaks for 2/12/2019: I AM #3: The Life

John 14:6 (ESV) – Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me…”

In the early 1900’s, one doctor determined the weight of the human soul by weighing people just before they died and just after they died. He concluded the body of a person who has just died weighs 21 grams less than when they were alive – that was because the soul had left the body, therefore the soul must weigh 21 grams! (Lots of issues with his work!!!)   

Jesus claimed to be “the life”. He says that he came that we may have “life abundant”. Those two things suggest to me that he came to give us “life” by giving us himself, by abiding in us, not merely to give  us some quantitative number of years or a specific set of biological functions.

We believe life originates from God/Jesus. Jesus created everything that exists and therefore it stands to reason he created life. Only life can give rise to other life, only life can procreate. We are his children partly because he gave us life.

But as I thought about life in conjunction with the cessation of life – what we refer to as death – I became more and more convinced that Jesus doesn’t just give us “life” after we die. We who are his children have his very DNA (spiritually speaking) because he lives inside of us. We are begotten by him and that involves the passing along of DNA. It isn’t necessary for him to give us something new called “life” after we die because he lives in us and is already alive forevermore. Death can’t ultimately kill us because he lives within us, not because he’ll eventually give us life eternal. That which is made up of his DNA is already eternal. When we are resurrected, we will rise not because he reached into our graves and gave us something new, but because we have had life from the moment we became his and no one and nothing can take that away from us – not cancer, not heart disease, not murder, not sin and not the grave. So, in a sense, it won’t be us who rise, but Christ in us that pulls us upward out of the tomb or the depths of the sea. The grave couldn’t deny him 2000 years ago and it won’t deny him then. Nothing will prevent that eventuality from happening!

His life is our life: Galatians 2:20 (ESV) – I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.

PRAYER: Let us yield our lives, dying to ourselves, so you may live in us more fully each day! In your name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 2/01/19 – No Pockets in a Shroud

Image result for burial shroud

DayBreaks for 2/01/2019: No Pockets in a Shroud

From the DayBreaks archive, 2009:

Matthew 6:19-20: Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moth and rust do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal.

In his commentary on this passage, William Barclay has some interesting things to say.

FIRST: The Jews always connected treasure with character. It related to things like treasure versus morality/honor. The Jews had a saying, “…in the hour of a man’s departure, neither silver, nor gold, nor precious stones accompany him, but only his knowledge of the Law, and his good works.” We might want to argue a bit with some of that theology, but the basic point is accurate: when we leave this planet it’s not like moving from one house to another. We won’t be able to take anything of material value with us to our new home.

SECOND: It is important where we put our treasure, because if our hearts value the things of this world, we will have little or no interest in the world beyond this one. Once upon a time, Dr. Johnson, a Christian man, was being led through a noble and magnificent castle and its surrounding gardens. When he had completed the tour, he turned to his companions and said, “These are the things which make it difficult to die.” Can’t we all identify with that? Haven’t you seen a beautiful home, a beautiful plane, a beautiful boat, a beautiful tropical isle that enticed you even a little bit? That whispers in your ear, “Wouldn’t you really like to have me? Aren’t I beautiful?” And a part of us answers, “Boy, would I!” But we can’t let the things of this world cloud our judgment. The things here are temporary – not permanent. The permanent is what resides in eternity – either good or bad.

There is an old Spanish proverb that says it all very simply: “There are no pockets in a shroud.” If only we could remember that each day! Our focus would be clearer, our perspective heavenly and our hearts would be set on things of heaven instead of things on earth. We’d be more interested in things that are eternal rather than 401k plans, stock splits and a home backed up to the waterway or golf course.

Maybe you need to create a little sign and put it over your desk, in your car, or on your refrigerator or mirror at home with that Spanish proverb on it. I think I will. And when my heart feels the tug towards something of this world, I pray that the Spirit will remind me to look at the proverb and that He’ll re-adjust my mindset.

PRAYER: Give us clear hearts, clear eyes, and clear minds to discern the relative value of this world and all it would tempt us with, and the everlasting value of Your home!    In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 1/29/18 – Flying on Autopilot

Image result for autopilot

DayBreaks for 1/28/2019: Neon Promises

From the DayBreaks archive, dated 1/26/2009:

From Ovi’s World of the Bizarre, December 4, 1997: “A bizarre incident occurred when Paul Sirks was trying to get his plane going, after it quit on landing. Sirks was trying to crank the propeller when the plane took off without a pilot. It reached 12,000 feet and flew around for two hours. It finally ran out of gas and crashed in a bean field northwest of Columbus.”

Galen’s Thoughts: I wish I’d seen Mr. Sirks chasing the plane after it started and it took off without him. Can you see him running after it? Can you imagine the phone call he must have made to the control tower?!

Fortunately, although the plane was destroyed, no one was hurt. But consider:

FIRST: Life can operate on autopilot. We can go from day to day, not paying much attention to the details of life, and just “letting it happen”. Life will oblige us, for a while – until all of a sudden it comes crashing down for lack of neglect to the things that are important. It may be a teen who crashes for lack of parental involvement, a marriage that founders because of lack of effort and time, a job that is lost because of laziness and refusal to learn and grow. It is dangerous to fly on autopilot – life can fly that way for a while, but it’s not the best way. Consider the advice given in Proverbs 6:6-11, that encourages us to think about life carefully so we aren’t “poverty stricken”: Go to the ant, you sluggard; consider its ways and be wise! It has no commander, no overseer or ruler, yet it stores its provisions in summer and gathers its food at harvest. How long will you lie there, you sluggard? When will you get up from your sleep? A little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to rest– and poverty will come on you like a bandit and scarcity like an armed man. Remember – there is more than one kind of poverty, and the most tragic poverty of all is the poverty of the soul.

SECOND: I’m sure we’ve all seen movies where the pilot of an airplane is killed or dies from a heart attack and someone on board the plane has to do some heroic flying (even though they’ve never been trained). Sometimes it has a happy ending – sometimes not. It is at a moment like that when you really appreciate having a pilot that knows what he’s doing – who has been trained to do the job and do it right. Who is the pilot of your life? Are you trying to fly solo? Some of the time?

Part of the job of the shepherd is to guide and direct the sheep – to make sure they get safely where they are supposed to go. Jesus knows the way – he knows how to really “fly” – and he will give you wings (1 Thes. 4:17: After that, we who are still alive and are left will be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And so we will be with the Lord forever.)

Now that’s how to fly!!!

Prayer: Give us the wisdom, Lord, to look deeply and honestly into our lives to consider our ways.  May we yield control of our lives into Your great and Almighty hands.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 1/17/19 – There Is No Other Stream

Image result for Aslan by the stream

DayBreaks for 01/17/2019: There Is No Other Stream

There’s a story in The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis about a girl named Jill Pole, and Aslan, the great Christ-figure lion in the story.  Jill has grown thirsty in the forest, and she hears the sound of the stream in the distance.  Her thirst drives her to find the stream so she can drink.  She knows that a great lion is afoot, so she’s cautious.  Finally, she sees the stream, but is terrified by what she sees.  Her thirst is like a fire, but sitting by the stream of water is Aslan, the huge lion, very much alive, though sitting very still.  She waits until she’s nearly crazed from thirst, hoping he’ll go away, but he doesn’t budge.

Suddenly, he spoke: “If you are thirsty, you may drink.”  Jill is startled and holds back.  “Are you not thirsty?, said the Lion.

“I am dying of thirst,” said Jill.

“Then drink,” said the lion.

“May I..could I..would you mind going away while I do?” said Jill.  The Lion answered this only by a look and a very low growl.  And just as Jill gazed at its motionless bulk, she realized that she might as well have asked the whole mountain to move aside for her convenience.  The delicious rippling noise of the stream was driving her near frantic.

“Will you promise not to – do anything to me, if I come?”

“I make no promise,” said the Lion.  Jill was so thirsty now that, without noticing it, she had come a step nearer.

“Do you eat girls?” she said.

“I have swallowed up girls and boys, women and men, kings and emperors, cities and realms,” said the Lion.  It didn’t say this as if it were boasting, nor as if it were sorry, nor as if it were angry.  It just said it.

“I daren’t come and drink,” said Jill.

“Then you will die of thirst,” said the Lion.

“Oh, dear!” said Jill, coming another step nearer.  “I suppose I must go and look for another stream then.”

“There is no other stream,” said the Lion.”

I’ve been thirsty before – what I considered (at the time) as desperately thirsty, although I’m sure it was nothing compared to what some have endured.  I like this story from The Silver Chair because it describes the decision that we must all make: the God of Scripture is a wild, untamed God who has crushed empires literally overnight.  He is a God who does as He pleases, for the reasons that suit His purposes, for His glory – and not for ours.  He is a God who makes no excuses (and because He is God and Sovereign) and who needs no excuses to be made for Him or offered up for Him.  He simply is God – God Almighty and no one can thwart Him in anything He decides to do.  He is alternately terrifying and the tender One who holds little children on His lap and blesses them.  He is everywhere at all times and at times disturbingly silent and seemingly absent.  He is a God who is not content to have just created – but a God who chooses to insert Himself into His creation when and if it pleases Him – but who at other times is maddeningly distant.

What will happen if we come to the river to drink?  This God is frightening – just ask Jill Pole.  But there is no other stream – there is no fountain of youth and there is no other fountain of Life than that which flowed from the veins and mercy of Christ.  Come to the stream – drink – be refreshed and know that He remains God – and you are not He.

John 4:10 (NIV)Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God and who it is that asks you for a drink, you would have asked him and he would have given you living water.

John 4:13-14 (NIV)Jesus answered, “Everyone who drinks this water will be thirsty again, 14 but whoever drinks the water I give him will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give him will become in him a spring of water welling up to eternal life.”

PRAYER: You are high and lifted up, Lord God Almighty.  We tremble in fear of Your great power and come timidly before You where we are encouraged by Your welcome and invitation to drink – and find not death, but Life!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 12/14/18 – Aiming Past Life

10404265_863017997075694_7296625031381313994_n

DayBreaks for 12/14/18: Aiming Past Life

From the DayBreaks Archive, 12/9/98:

Okay, let’s see how many of you have tried this: have you ever put a board (even just one – and maybe a thin one at that) between two bricks and tried to break the board with your hand?  I’ve tried it – on more than one occasion.  I’ve seen it done in person (in fact, my oldest granddaughter can do it!) – but not just with one board, but with many boards, with cement blocks or blocks of solid ice.  I can only say that if you tried it, I hope you were more successful than I.  And I hope you didn’t hurt yourself, either!

It isn’t just big, hulking guys who do this kind of stuff.  I’ve seen little folk do it – men and women.  So the key to the ability to smash stuff like that with your bare hands can’t be based on brute strength. 

There are actually two things that are necessary, according to those who bust stuff with their bare hands, if one is to break boards, ice or cement blocks with nothing more than the edge of a hand.  Here they are: 1) focused concentration, and 2) aiming at a point just beyond the board.  In other words, it is important to not get distracted by things around you as you focus on hitting a point in your mind that is just beyond the visible board.  Of course, the “point” you aim at isn’t visible because the board blocks it from view, so that’s where the focus also comes into play.

Life is often somewhat like that board.  It’s hard and unyielding.  We bump up against it over and over and bruises are usually the result.  Life doesn’t bend, as a general rule.  If we are to break through the frustration of living in this world, we must be focused, and we must aim at something beyond this life – something that is just on the other side of what is visible.  And then we must drive with all our force to that “something” that is just beyond our sight. 

For Christians, we take note of what the Word says in 2 Corinthians 4:18 (NIV) – So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen. For what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.  What is seen is like the board – it’s not really the goal – the goals is unseen, just on the “other side”.  And again, Hebrews 12:2 (NIV) instructs us: Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.  We are to focus all our energy, our vision, on Jesus.  And where is he?  Seated at the right hand of the throne of God.  He’s in the realm of the unseen, and he awaits us just beyond what is visible.

Another way to think of this is that death is the board – a door, if you will – that prevents us from seeing what is not unseen.  But it will not always be so.  And what will we see when we break through?  Jesus.

PRAYER: We pray that You will sharpen our focus and help us to remember that we are not to aim at things in this life that would distract us from what is presently unseen.  Strengthen us to look beyond this life to see the Risen Son seated in glory, awaiting our arrival!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2018 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 12/04/18 – The Secret to a Wise Heart

Image result for tombstone

DayBreaks for 12/04/18: The Secret to a Wise Heart

From the DayBreaks archive, November 2008:

We don’t like to think about death at all, let alone our own death.  We’d like to just ignore it until it happens.  We are more than content to live under a grand illusion that we have an unlimited number of days to live.  And so we drift aimlessly from day to day, moment to moment, never considering death.

Moses had an interesting prayer that he offered up in Psalm 90:12 (NIV) –Teach us to number our days aright, that we may gain a heart of wisdom.  There are two key things in this brief passage that we should note:

FIRST: we have to be taught to number our days correctly.  We can’t figure it out on our own – or at least, we won’t figure it out ourselves.  We are too happily living out our delusion about limitless days, trying as hard as we can to be oblivious to our impending demise.  I don’t know if mankind ever really knew how to number his days correctly.  I doubt that we were created with that sense of limited days because when Adam and Eve were created, they weren’t created to die.  That’s something that came about after the fall.  It was only after death entered onto the stage that it became necessary to learn, to be taught, that we have a finite number of days allotted to us and that we don’t know how many days we have.

SECOND: we can’t have a heart of wisdom until we learn to number our days.  Why?  Because we can’t live wisely until we learn to number our days.  Considering our mortality leads us to view each day of life differently, to cherish it and appreciate it in ways we can’t even imagine if we don’t consider our finiteness.  We can’t live rightly until we know we will die rightly.  And we must contemplate death if we are to live rightly.

Towards that end, as I shared with our congregation last week, I’ve added something to my daily prayer that seems to be helping me to do a much better job of numbering my days and living accordingly.  It’s very simple, and I’d encourage you to add something similar to your morning prayer: “Lord, if this is to be my last day, may I live it in Jesus with great joy and wonder.”

Prayer: We need hearts that are wise, Lord, hearts that consider our deaths so that we can live more appropriately in each moment of the time we have been given.  Teach us, Lord, to number our days.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2018 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>