DayBreaks for 10/05/20 – Being Carried

It was so long ago but I will never forget how precious it was to carry my children! I even have vague memories of being carried by my father’s strong arms when I was little. There is nothing quite as sweet as when a little child wraps their arms around your neck, puts their head on your shoulder and snuggles in.

There were times after our second and third children came along that I’d be carrying a couple of them while my wife carried another. I must confess that by that time they were getting older…and heavier!…and that at times it was hard to carry them for a long time.

A little child has no conception of the fact that they are making your arm muscles burn until they hurt! They don’t think about the reality that the parent is carrying their full weight. All they know is that they are being held, and carried, and they feel safe.

We are told that we have a Father that carries us (Ps. 68.19, NLT2): Praise the Lord; praise God our savior! For each day he carries us in his arms. But here’s a key difference between how God carries us and how I carried my children (Dt. 33.27a, NLT2): The eternal God is your refuge, and his everlasting arms are under you.

You see, my arms got weary and tired, but God’s almighty and everlasting arms will never tire of carrying us! He won’t have to put a single one of us down to regain his strength. And many have been the times when he was carrying us and we were unaware of how he bore our weight and did all the work for us.

There is also a commonality between my carrying of our kids and God’s carrying of us: it is a delight to the father to carry his kids!

Are you weary? Struggling to even stand let alone move forward? Run to God, let him pick you up, feel his massive almighty and everlasting arms underneath and around you, rest your head on his shoulder…and find peace!

PRAYER: Thank you for carrying us and holding us close to your heart, inviting us to run to you for peace! In Jesus’ name, Amen.Copyright 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple. ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 9/18/20 – The Cause of Fears

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NOTE: I am on a “retirement/anniversary” trip and will be out until late September. In the meantime, I’m sharing recycled DayBreaks for 2010. Thanks for your understanding!

From the DayBreaks archive, September 2010:

It doesn’t take much to look up the definition of worry or fear.  They are close cousins – related by blood and tears.  It is all the more interesting to learn what Jesus, not Webster or Freud, thinks about the cause of worry.  He gives us his definition of it in Matthew 6:25, when he said, That is why I tell you not to worry about everyday life – whether you have enough

Do you see it?  “Whether you have enough…”  Our worries are about shortfalls, lack of supply.  It might be that we are afraid we won’t have enough time to complete our bucket list or even to complete today’s tasks, that we won’t have enough good luck to win or even to survive, that our smarts just don’t rate up there high enough, that we won’t be able to receive or give enough love or even that God’s forgiveness will run short just when I get to the front of the line.  We are worried about the supply of oil.  The fact is, we worry about just about everything – fearing that there won’t be enough of it.  There’s only one problem with this: worry doesn’t work.

Jesus went on to talk about the birds of the air and the flowers of the fields.  Neither worries.  As far as we know, no flower or bird has ever worried.  It seems that worry and its cousin, fear, barge into the human mind alone.  Maybe it’s because we are the only beings capable of that level of thought, or that we’re the only creatures that are so self-centered. 

Isn’t it true in your life that when you are worried you are not thinking about God?  You are trying to figure out how to do something, trying to predict the future or control future events.  You are wondering how to manipulate people, events, materials and situations to create the outcome that YOU desire.  We do these things when we are worried about what’s happening.

In my experience, when I am worried, if I pull back and just concentrate on God and His love and care for me, on His promises of not leaving me, of working things out for my best and not my worst, then I find my fear going away. 

God knows, Jesus says, what it is that we need and how much of it we need.  He knows that better than I.  He also knows what will be good for me and what will turn out to be harmful.  Our challenge is to trust His judgment and wisdom and not our own.

PRAYER: I confess, Lord, that I at times worry about whether there will be enough of this or of that, or whether things will work out in ways that I want them to.  Help me to not try to control if, when or how much You choose to give me, but to trust that Your wisdom far surpasses mine in all ways!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.Copyright 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple. ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 9/08/20 – Fear, Part 2

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NOTE: I am on a “retirement/anniversary” trip and will be out until late September. In the meantime, I’m sharing recycled DayBreaks for 2010. Thanks for your understanding!

From the DayBreaks archive, September 2010:

The gospels record for us the story of Jesus and his disciples crossing the Sea of Galilee when a violent storm arises.  While the disciples are trying to save their skin from the raging storm, Jesus sleeps.  I don’t know how many of you have ever been in a serious earthquake, but it certainly gets your attention!  It would be hard to sleep through a “big one”.  The word that Matthew uses to describe the storm is one we don’t usually associate with the ocean.  He used the term seismos to describe the violence of the storm.  This is the same word we use to describe an earthquake – seismographs record the shaking of the earth.  Matthew uses this word on two other occasions, too: 1) when the earth shook at Jesus’ death; 2) when the earth shook at Jesus’ resurrection.  Clearly, this was a terrific storm to have qualified for the word seismos!  Yet one gets the sense that Jesus would and could have just kept sleeping through the entire “seismic” event.

It is instructive to see what fear does to the disciples when this storm hits them.  First, though, let’s notice that the storm came “suddenly” upon them.  It hadn’t been building for some time – it was not stormy one moment, and then the weather changed – FAST!  Some of the storms that bring fear into our lives are long, drawn out storms that we can see coming and that stay for a long time.  Others, like this storm, take us by surprise.  Either way, there are things we need to learn about what fear does to us from this story:

FEAR CAUSES THEM TO QUESTION JESUS’ CARE FOR THEM.  They asked Jesus, after waking him up, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?”  They immediately question Jesus’ goodness and the genuineness of His care for them.  Doesn’t that sound familiar?  When storms hit many people – their first reaction is “What’s wrong with You, God?  I thought you cared about me!”  This is one of the most tragic effects of fear – even on His closest followers.

FEAR CAUSES THEM TO BECOME CONTROL FREAKS.  Implicit in their criticism that Jesus must not care for them is the unspoken demand that He should care about them and that it is about time that He demonstrates that!  Fear arises because we suddenly find things spinning out of our control, so we grab on to something that gives us at least the illusion of having control.  For some, they run to the cupboard and pull out chocolate, others will reach for the bottle or work extra hours or clean the house until it is spotless all in an effort to have some control and sense of being in control. 

FEAR CAUSES THEM TO NOT SEEK JESUS’ HELP: It is interesting that the disciples do not ask Jesus to do anything.  Instead, they accuse him, as already noted, of not caring. 

FEAR CAUSES THEM TO FORGET REASONS THEY SHOULD BELIEVE: Don’t forget that these are men who have been with Jesus for a while – they’ve seen him do amazing things such as give healing to the sick, sight to the blind, strength to shriveled and crippled limbs, turn water into wine and cast out demons.  Shouldn’t all those things have been enough to create belief?  Yes, they should…but fear does funny things to us and makes us forget prior deliverances and demonstrations of God’s power and love. 

These are all daunting problems created by fear, but the worst of all may be that when we are afraid, our safety becomes the primary thing in our life.  As Max Lucado put it, our fear-driven concern for our safety becomes our god until the storm has passed.  It was so with the disciples – even though God was riding in the boat with them.

PRAYER: Lord, forgive us for questioning your care for us, for trying to control you and our circumstances, for trying to order you around, for not seeking your assistance, for forgetting all the reasons we have to trust in your goodness and love.  Don’t let us make our own safety our god!  In Jesus’ name, Amen. Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 7/15/20 – Not Even Close

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From the DayBreaks archive, July 2010:

Do you get discouraged of fighting the same battles over and over and over? It happens to me more often than I’d like to admit. I may have the best intentions in the world, but something comes up and my best intentions remain just that: intentions. I’m reminded of all the times my kids were little and I promised them I’d take them to the park to play on the playground equipment some evening after work – but by the time I got home I was just too tired. The day had pressed hard upon me and I couldn’t find the energy and my plan fell flat, along with the look of excitement and hope in my children’s eyes. It breaks my heart to even think about how I let them down – and how many times I disappointed them.

Sometimes it seems as if all the world is that way. Have you noticed? There are days when it seems that this world is on a greased sled destined straight for hell. And I guess, in a way, that is true. What became of God’s glorious plan to win the world to Himself in love? How could anyone resist the story of a love so great, and which was manifested so clearly? Yet clearly, sadly, it is true. The world is going to hell for the single reason that most reject God’s offer of grace, mercy and forgiveness.

Has God’s plan failed? Did He make the cosmic mistake of all time by entrusting His plan into human hands? I mean, if He wanted to be sure the job got done right, why didn’t he give the job of evangelization to the archangel Michael? Surely, he could have persuaded more people to believe in God than sinful, deceitful, fallen man!!

I can’t tell you why God did it the way He did. I can’t answer the tough questions that people send me about God’s plan and seeming risky choices. You will have to ask those questions to God yourself – and be content with the fact that you may not get an answer until you get to ask Him in person. Has God failed?

I know that God, when He walked among mankind, wept in sympathy. He cried as He stood by the tomb of Lazarus. He cried in prayer – especially in the garden of Gethsemane. But when the canopy of the sky splits wide open and Jesus comes back, one thing will be certain: that God’s eternal plan – conceived before the foundation of the world – was never threatened, never put in jeopardy, never was it even close to being on the edge of defeat.

For all the times we look around us at the horror in the world and are tempted to wonder where God went to (is it any wonder that during the chaotic 60’s and 70’s that the “God is dead” movement started?), we will do well to remember that God hasn’t gone anywhere. He isn’t off fighting a last gasp battle in an effort to win the war. The war is done – over- caput. All that is left is the mopping up action.

Someday when you get up in the morning – it will be the last time you get up. It will be the last time you will ever sleep. It will be the last sunrise you ever see. Your plans for your life may not have worked out like you wanted them to. But God’s plans for your life – for your eternity – are doing just fine, thank you. Don’t worry – God isn’t about to be knocked out in the final round. No “Hail Mary” passes at the end of the 4th quarter of time will defeat Him. And because He will win you need to be sure that you are on His side if you want to share in His victory.

PRAYER: In this world of so much bitterness, hatred and confusion, I am so grateful that Your plan is being executed perfectly!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 7/08/20 – The Christian’s Security

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DayBreaks for 7/08/20: The Christian’s Security

Security is a dancing phantom, much like the shadows of clouds that flit across the landscape. Yet we long for security in an insecure world. We fear for our health. We fear for our financial “security”. We seek secure investments. We lock our doors in an effort to ensure security. We fear hackers and stolen identities, so we pay for security systems to make our digital identities secure. We may arm ourselves to ward off a nightime intruder. We don’t walk alone at night in a dark place. We do all these things because of our fears in an effort to be secure.

Security in Jesus is not something that I was raised with. In many ways, I grew up in a hellfire and brimstone church that had one trembling with fear every time you had an evil thought or did something you shouldn’t. At those moments we were urged to smell the smoke of the pit that was licking at our feet and about to pull us downward forever.

I thank God that I’ve learned a bit more about security as a Christ-believer. Consider these things:

ONE: the Christian is united with Christ, seated with him (Ephesians 2:6);

TWO: we are hidden with him in God (Colossians 3:3);

THREE: we cannot be divided or separated from him by life or death or anything in existence (John 10:29, Romans 8:38-39).

What is the implication of those things? Simply put it is this: the Christian is as secure as Christ himself is secure!!!  And you just don’t get more secure than that. 

I love what Martin Luther said: World, death, devil, hell, away and leave me in peace! You have no hold on me. If you will not let me live, then I will die. But you won’t succeed in that. Chop my head off, and it won’t harm me. I have One who will give me a new one.

It is so much better to smell the rarified air of heaven than the smoke of the pit.

Believer: rest in Christ. You are as secure as he himself is!

PRAYER: We shout with joy for the security we have found in your, Lord God! Thank you for understanding our fears and our need to feel secure and for giving us the security we sought! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 6/30/20 – The Good Land Where Things Die

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DayBreaks for 6/30/20: The Good Land Where Things Die

It seems to be a rule that for there to be new beginnings, new life, that things must die. The NT speaks of this in various ways: Jesus spoke of how a kernel of wheat must fall into the ground and die for a new plant to grow, we are told that if we want to have life we must die to our own life, we are even told to put to death the “old man” so a new man can life and as Jesus told Nicodemus, we must be born again.

As humans, of course, we don’t think of death as being good. Our pets die and we grieve, our dreams die and we are disheartened, our friends and family die and we are crushed by the dark enemy. We are told that flesh and blood (at least as we know it) cannot be part of the world to come – that we will need new bodies fit for an eternal life, not a temporal one.

Perhaps instead of fighting all forms of death, we should look for the benefits of death. It is good that some things die, after all. Fortunately, there is a place – a good land, a very special and holy place – where things die. Where is it? It’s found at the foot of the cross.

At the blood soaked ground at the foot of the cross is where my shame dies for all the things I’ve done that I don’t want anyone to know about. Why?  Because Jesus took my shame. My guilt dies there as the blood drips from Jesus’ hands, feet, back and side. Why? Because Jesus took my guilt on him. My fear of dying dies there because Jesus would prove a mere three days later that death has no choice but to yield to glorious life because of Jesus power. My sense of insignificance dies there when I think of the blood he shed and what he endured because of one thing and on thing only: he loves me and I matter to him. My fear of the future dies at the foot of the cross because by what he accomplished there, there is no longer any condemnation for me.

But along with the death of those things that I take to the foot of the cross, there is new life springing up from the moistened soil. I can now live a new life without shame and guilt plaguing me. I can face the future, as the song says, because he lives and promises me I will live, too (and he’s proved he can pull off that “trick”). And I need never feel insignificant, unimportant, unwanted, uncherished ever again because in the good land where things go to die, any doubt about those things was erased.

PRAYER: What holy ground is this, Lord Jesus, that we are invited to the ground at the foot of your cross where bad things die and good things spring up filled with eternal life! In your magnificent name we pray, Amen!

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 5/18/20 – Time and the Lord’s Plan

Whose Plan is Better: GOD'S Plan or YOURS? —

DayBreaks for 5/18/20: Time and the Lord’s Plan

As earth-bound creatures we are also bound by time. We have watches and phones and computers and sirens and even the sun and moon mark the passing of time for us. We can’t get away from it. We often feel there isn’t either enough, or there’s too much of it. But have we really considered how it is the servant of the Most High?

We are in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. As of the day of this writing, in our county alone in Illinois 5,904 persons have tested positive and 298 have taken their last breath. We are all anxious for time to pass and this to be over. We hope for a vaccine to put it behind us.

What does all this have to do with time and God’s plan? Consider this: imagine taking a 3 year old to the doctor and the doctor says it’s time for the child to have a vaccination. And just before the needle is inserted into the child’s arm, there is great weeping, fighting against the invasion of the needle into the tiny, flailing arm. The screaming is heartbreaking. Does the child than the doctor for that shot? No! Even the mother or father are heartbroken for what the child is going through.

But imagine, years or decades later, an outbreak of the disease sweeps across the face of the earth. People are sick and dying. But the one who was that young child does not get the dread disease because of those few moments of pain as a child. You see, the vaccine protected the child and it was only through the passing of the time that the child can appreciate what the parent and doctor did years before.

There are many things that happen to us that are painful. Like that young child we wonder why our Father put us through them, why he led us bear the pain in our lives. But know this: He never causes pain except to prevent greater pain for us. Only in hindsight can we see how these things may have saved us even greater pain and loss. Time has been the servant of the Lord in such cases.

The present pandemic, well, it is painful. But we are being taught lessons, lessons we may not even be aware of at the present. Yet there is a purpose – a far greater purpose that we cannot envision – and we have God’s promise that ALL His plans for us are for our good. Find comfort in that promise!

Jeremiah 29:11 (MSG) – I know what I’m doing. I have it all planned out—plans to take care of you, not abandon you, plans to give you the future you hope for.

PRAYER: Lord, we are impatient and have such limited sight into the reasons for all that happens. May we trust you so much that we can endure with patience the present pain to know that there is purpose for all that happens to us. And give us the wisdom to wait for the understanding with faith in you. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 4/30/20 – The Truth About an Eclipse

Total solar eclipse to be visible in Central Texas in 2024

DayBreaks for 4/30/20: The Truth About an Eclipse

From the DayBreaks archive, April 2010:

I’m sure that you’ve seen an eclipse of the moon.  Probably of the sun, too.  It is interesting the way that we talk about a solar eclipse.  We often refer to it as the sun being darkened.  Of course, in reality the sun isn’t darkened at all, is it?  It only seems like it has been darkened because the moon has come between the earth and the sun thus blocking out some of the light rays from the sun and making it appear as if much of the sun’s blazing inferno has been extinguished.

I remember a fairly major eclipse of the sun a few years back.  It took place while I was at work early in the afternoon in the summer time.  While it didn’t get dark, the light certainly was different – rather eerie in fact.  It didn’t have the same intensity and it was darker and cooler.  It was very, very strange.

The prophet Joel spoke of a time when the sun and moon would be darkened in Joel 3:15-16 – The sun and moon will be darkened, and the stars no longer shine. The LORD will roar from Zion and thunder from Jerusalem; the earth and the sky will tremble.  But the LORD will be a refuge for his people, a stronghold for the people of Israel.  In this passage, Joel describes a time of judgment – it will be a trying time for the earth and creation.  But rather than leaving His people in fear, God tells them that He will be a refuge for them.

How does this relate to us today?  We are prone to times of darkness, aren’t we?  I have NEVER met anyone who didn’t have to deal with fear, discouragement, disappointment, failure and the darkness of the pit of sin.  It is simply part of the human condition.  And when times get bad, really bad, what is our first reaction?  We wonder what has happened to God – why He hasn’t “fixed things”.  We begin to wonder (probably not consciously for we would be afraid to mouth the words out loud) if God has lost His power or His capacity to care and be moved by the plight of mere humans.  He seems distant, cold.  And we assume that “God must not love me any more.”

Nothing could be further from the truth.  We make the false assumption that the God who has demonstrated His love to us before has changed.  That His love no longer shines fully for us.  Why?  Because the world has grown cold and dark.  But we need to remember the truth about eclipses: the sun hasn’t change.  The only thing that has happened is that something has come between us and the sun, blocking it’s light and warmth.  Many times (not always, but usually) when life grows dark, we assume the Son has changed.  He hasn’t.  He’s the same yesterday, today and tomorrow.  He CANNOT change – God is immutable (a theological term meaning He can’t change).  So when your world next seems dark and cold, think about the eclipse.  Look to see if there is something that has come between you and the Son.  If so, MOVE!  Get back into his Light once again and let it dispel the darkness. 

God’s love for you doesn’t change.  It burns brightly all the time – even when it seems to be dark.  If you are feeling abandoned, like your prayers aren’t reaching Him and His love isn’t reaching you, my guess is that you either haven’t been looking at things right or there is something that has come between you and Him.  Don’t let it stay that way.  The Light is much better than the darkness!

PRAYER: Fill our lives with the fire or the Light this day and encourage us in our present darkness! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2020, Galen C. Dalrymple.

DayBreaks for 4/22/20: The Hallway Through the Sea #20 – The God of Small Things

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DayBreaks for 4/22/20: The Hallway Through the Sea, #20 – The God of Small Things

The following is the latest in a series of daily meditations amid the pandemic. For today’s musical pairing, try Anastasiya Petryshak’s performance of Schubert’s Ave Maria.” All songs for this series have been gathered into a Spotify playlist.

Then the word of the Lord came to me: ‘The hands of Zerubbabel have laid the foundation of this temple; his hands will also complete it. Then you will know that the Lord Almighty has sent me to you. Who dares despise the day of small things, since the seven eyes of the Lord that range throughout the earth will rejoice when they see the chosen capstone in the hand of Zerubbabel?’ – Zechariah 4:8–10

Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothes? Look at the birds of the air; they do not reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. … See how the flowers of the field grow. They do not labor or spin. Yet I tell you that not even Solomon in all his splendor was dressed like one of these. If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today and tomorrow is throw into the fire, will he not much more clothe you—you of little faith? – Matthew 6:25–26, 28–30

Meditation 20. 2,544,769 confirmed cases, 175,621 deaths globally.

It was midnight when I made my way into the center of the Old City of Jerusalem. The clouds were low and impenetrable. Golden light flooded the Western Wall Plaza, which was filled with Jews in all manner of dress chanting and singing in lament. It was a day of mourning, written into the Jewish calendar. Surrounded by the intensity of their cries and weeping, beneath the mount where the temple and the Holy of Holies once stood, it felt as though I stood at the beating heart of the universe.

I wonder how it felt to the Israelites when they returned from their exile and found their city and their temple in ruins. When they began to rebuild, when they set the foundation, it must have seemed so paltry and miniscule compared to the temple that was remembered in the collective consciousness of their people. Some were glad to see a beginning made, but others groaned that the beginning was too modest. Do not “despise the day of small things,” God tells the prophet Zechariah. Unless you place the first stone, you cannot place the last.

The prophet heard right. Zerubbabel restored the temple. It stood for nearly six centuries, expanded by the Hasmoneans and most famously by Herod the Great. By the time Jesus taught the Sermon on the Mount in the hills over the Sea of Galilee, it was one of the most renowned structures in the entire world.

Do not be anxious over your food or over your clothing, Jesus taught upon that hillside. God cares about these things for you. He cares about the birds of the air and the lilies of the field. How much more will he care about your needs, even those that seem small and insignificant in the grand scheme?

Two thousand years later, we may find ourselves wondering whether God still cares for the flowers and the birds…(Click here to read the rest of this meditation.)

PRAYER: Help us, O Lord, to exercise that particular expression of faith of believing you care about even the most minute matters. They matter to you when they matter to us.  Help us also to have faith that even the small things can become great things in time. Even the most monumental works are modest at first. May we find those small beginnings now, where we can build stone upon stone until we have constructed something that will endure to your glory for generations. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

PRAYER: Until then, O Lord, may our season of solitude bear fruit in the lives of those we love, even those we cannot be with. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Link to Christianity Today Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CTMagazine

DayBreaks for 4/02/20 – The Hallway Through the Sea #10 – Be Not Afraid

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DayBreaks for 4/02/20: The Hallway Through the Sea #10 – Be Not Afraid

From Christianity Today and Tim Dalrymple, 4/01/20:

Today’s musical pairing is “Spiegel im Spiegel” by Arvo Pärt. Note that all the songs for this series have been gathered into a Spotify playlist here.

“The Lord is my light and my salvation—whom shall I fear? The Lord is the stronghold of my life—of whom shall I be afraid?” – Psalm 27:1

“Then Jesus said to his disciples: ‘There I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat; or about your body, what you will wear. For life is more than food, and the body more than clothes. Consider the ravens: they do not sow or reap, they have no storeroom or barn; yet God feeds them. And how much more valuable you are than birds! Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to your life? Since you cannot do this very little thing, why do you worry about the rest?’” – Luke 12:11-26

Day 9. 926,095 confirmed cases, 46,413 deaths globally.

Calling these anxious times is like calling love an emotion: true, obvious, and understating the experience.

Soon we will crest a million confirmed cases and fifty thousand deaths. Tens of thousands of deaths seem certain in the United States in the month to come. Even when the contagion slows in one place, it will accelerate in another. What will happen when the pandemic devours cities with fewer resources than ours? How many will die in Kolkata and Karachi, Cairo and Lagos, Mexico City and São Paulo?

Our hearts are tense. Our thoughts are restless. We find it difficult to concentrate. We read the streams of online content constantly and desperately. We devour the news and the news devours us. So many of us have lost friends and loved ones already. Others await the day.

We tend to think of anxiety as a physiological and psychological phenomenon. It is also a spiritual reality.

The Bible counsels against fear time and again. Do not be afraid. Be strong and courageous. Fear not. Therefore I tell you do not worry. Do not be anxious about anything. Perfect love drives out fear. The witness of scripture is consistent and clear that we are not to remain in fear and anxiety but to go beyond them to faith.

Søren Kierkegaard describes anxiety as fear in search of an object. Anxiety latches onto things and persuade us those things cause the anxiety. But anxiety actually precedes the object, and if the object of our anxiety were removed then our anxiety would swiftly find something else to worry over…  (Click this link to read the rest of the meditation.)

PRAYER: Give us this faith, O Lord, not to waste our time in futile anxiety over our lives and our circumstances. Give us this faith to rest completely in you, our stronghold. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Link to Christianity Today’s Facebook page

The Hallway Through the Sea is a series of daily meditations from the president and CEO of Christianity Today, written specifically for those struggling through the coronavirus pandemic. It will address our sense of fear and isolation and also the ways we find beauty and truth and hope—and Christ himself—in the midst of suffering. The title of the column alludes to the passage of the Israelites through the Red Sea. We are a people redeemed from our enslavement to sin, yet we find ourselves living between where we were and where we are meant to be. Danger looms on both sides, but our hope and our faith is that God will deliver us through the sea and into the land of promise. If you wish, you can follow Timothy Dalrymple on Twitter @TimDalrymple_

PREVIOUS THE HALLWAY THROUGH THE SEA COLUMNS:

Out of the Depths

Chosen in the Furnace

The First Word and the Last

More . . .

Link to video with facts, symptoms and prevention tips about coronavirus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AITtaAAAdYc

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>