DayBreaks for 4/23/19 – The King and the Poison

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DayBreaks for 4/23/19: The King and the Poison

From the DayBreaks archived, 2009: (sorry, I just can’t let go of Easter yet – it is too good to be done already!)

From Max Lucado’s Six Hours One Friday comes a parable-type telling of the garden and the crucifixion:

“Finally that hour came.  The Son went for one last visit with his Father.  He met Him in another garden.  A garden of gnarled trees and stony soil.

“Does it have to be this way?” 

“It does.”

“Is there no one else who can do it?”

The King swallowed.  “None but you.”

“Do I have to drink from the cup?”

“Yes, my Child.  The same cup.”

He looked at the Prince of Light.  “The darkness will be great.”  He passed his hand over the spotless face of his Son.  “The pain will be awful.”  Then he paused and looked at his darkened dominion.  When he looked up, his eyes were moist.  “But there is no other way.”

“The Son looked into the stars as he heard the answer.  “Then, let it be done.”

Slowly the words that would kill the Son began to come from the lips of the Father: “Hour of death, moment of sacrifice, it is your moment.  Rehearsed a million times on false altars with false lambs; the moment of truth has come.”

“Soldiers, do you think you lead him?  Ropes, you think you bind him?  Men, you think you sentence him?  He heeds not your commands.  He winces not at your lashes.  It is my voice he obeys.  It is my condemnation he dreads.  And it is your souls he saves.

“Oh, my Son, my Child.  Look up into the heavens and see my face before I turn it.  Hear my voice before I silence it.  Would that I could save you and them.  But they don’t see and they don’t hear.

“The living must die so that the dying can live.  The time has come to kill the Lamb.

“Here is the cup, my Son.  The cup of sorrows.  The cup of sin.

“Slam, mallet!  Be true to your task.  Let your ring be heard throughout the heavens.

“Lift him, soldiers.  Lift him high to his throne of mercy.  Lift him up to his perch of death.  Lift him above the people that curse his name.

“Now plunge the tree into the earth.  Plunge it deep into the heart of humanity.  Deep into the strata of time past.  Deep into the sees of time future.

“Is there no angel to save my Isaac?  Is there no hand to redeem the Redeemer?

“Here is the cup, my Son.  Drink it alone.”

God must have wept as he performed his task.  Every lie, every lure, every act done in shadows was in that cup.  Slowly, hideously they were absorbed into the body of the Son.  The final act of incarnation.

The Spotless Lamb was blemished.  Flames began to lick his feet.

The King obeys his own edict.  “Where there is poison, there will be death.  Where there are goblets, there will be fire.

The King turns away from his Prince.  The undiluted wrath of a sin-hating Father falls upon his sin-filled Son.  The fire envelops him.  The shadow hides him.  The Son looks for his Father, but his Father cannot be seen.

“My God, my God….why?”
The throne room is dark and cavernous.  The eyes of the King are closed.  He is resting.

In his dream he is again in the Garden.  The cool of the evening floats across the river as the three walk.  They speak of the Garden – of how it is, of how it will be.

“Father…”, the Son begins.  The King replays the word again.  Father.  Father.  The word was a flower, petal-delicate, yet so easily crushed.  Oh, how he longed for his children to call him Father again.

A noise snaps him from his dream.  He opens his eyes and sees a transcendent figure gleaming in the doorway.  “It is finished, Father.  I have come home.”  – Six Hours One Friday, Max Lucado, Multhomah Press, 1989, pgs. 101-104

Prayer: God, forgive us!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

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DayBreaks for 4/22/19 – When Jesus Crashed the Party

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DayBreaks for 4/22/19: When Jesus Crashed the Party

We sometimes give Satan way too much credit. We need to remember that he is just a created being – an angel, although the leader of the fallen angels – and as such does not know everything. The angels, we are told, didn’t know what God was doing in the greatest story ever told. Let your imagination dive into the day Jesus crashed Satan’s party.

For millennia, Satan had been engaged in a war against God. Many times it appeared he’d gained the upper hand, only to be proven wrong. But when Jesus died, a great party must have started among the fallen angels. Satan, undoubtedly, was leading the revelry that proclaimed Satan’s victory of God. I feel confident he was boasting of how he’d outsmarted God and had gotten Jesus killed, foiling God’s plan. And for a period of something like 36 hours, the party in hell knew no limits as Satan ranted and bragged and proclaimed his great victory and God’s defeat.

But then, early in the Sunday morning quiet of a sealed tomb, Jesus crashed Satan’s party in the quietest possible way when his dead heart beat once. The twice, then building up to a steady rhythm and his first gasping breath as the lungs what had been breathless filled.

We tend to think that no one witnessed the resurrection. That’s not true. The angels saw it…including Satan. Perhaps the first breath almost skipped notice, but as Satan realized what happened, he must have screamed in terror, knowing that his boasting had all be a lie. With that first heartbeat, the first breath, Satan knew he’d been outsmarted – again – by the Almighty God, and that with that first breath, Satan was not only doomed, but eternally, irrevocably and utterly defeated. Hell must have become truly deathly silent  as the reality of their predicament became undeniably clear to all.

I hope you’ll take time to listen to this song, His Heart Beats, by Andrew Freeman. The lyrics are here. Check the lyrics as you listen to the song.

And now, because of Jesus’ heart that started to beat, it is our turn to join the party that will last forever.

Prayer: Thank you, Jesus, for defeating death, the grave and Satan! Let the eternal celebration of your great victory come soon! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for Easter Sunday, 4/21/19 – This Was More than Just a Man

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DayBreaks for 4/21/19: This was More than Just a Man

Today is a glorious day because we focus on the greatest event ever – the resurrection of the Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

Today I want to share a song that has come to bless me in so many ways. I pray it will enrich your appreciation of His being risen as you worship him this day.

Hope is Alive – Kristine DiMarco

Hope is Alive – Kristine DiMarco (concert version)

Matthew 27:54 (NIV) – When the centurion and those with him who were guarding Jesus saw the earthquake and all that had happened, they were terrified, and exclaimed, “Surely he was the Son of God!”

Prayer: All glory and praise to the Lord Jesus forever and ever! Thank you that our hope, You, are alive today! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

 

DayBreaks for 4/19/19 – Ongoing Easter

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DayBreaks for 4/19/19: Ongoing Easter

Living in an ongoing Easter gets us finally home at last, for life is not an endless circle but life is moving to an end point. The crowning achievement of the risen Lord is to bring us finally home together with the whole family of God in that transition from time into eternity. It is a great privilege to witness that transition in the lives of people and F. Dean Leuking tells the story of one such woman. Her name was Augusta. She lived 100 years, raised in the prairies of South Dakota, faced every manner of hardship and heartache, but was buoyant and lived on the resurrection side of the cross, raised a family. In the last hour of her life standing with her daughters around her in the hospital room, I heard her bless her daughters. Being a mother to the very end and with a twinkle in her eye, looked at the faces of her daughters around her and pointed to them each one and said, “Too much lipstick,” and then closed her eyes in peaceful death. 

That is the goal toward which the ongoing Easter draws us and transforms our dark, gloomy mornings into a shining doxology. We say with all the faithful of all of the ages, blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. By His great mercy, we have been born anew to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead to an inheritance that is imperishable, unfailing and undefiled, kept in heaven for you. Though you must go through various trials, all this is so that your faith may redound to the praise, glory and honor of Jesus Christ. Without having seen Him, we love Him, and rejoice with unutterable and exalted joy. The outcome of your faith is the salvation of your souls.

Prayer: Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ who has given us a new birth and a living hope! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 4/18/19 – The Torch, the Old Man and the Hands of a King

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DayBreaks for 4/18/19: The Old Man, the Torch and the Hands of the King

From the DayBreaks archive, April 2009:

So He said to him, “Bring Me a three year old heifer, and a three year old female goat, and a three year old ram, and a turtledove, and a young pigeon.” Then he brought all these to Him and cut them in two, and laid each half opposite the other; but he did not cut the birds. The birds of prey came down upon the carcasses, and Abram drove them away. It came about when the sun had set, that it was very dark, and behold, there appeared a smoking oven and a flaming torch which passed between these pieces.  (Gen. 15:9-11, 17) 

Nearly 2000 years passed from the time God met with Abram (as noted above) and made His covenant.  Covenants were sealed in those days by this display of gore and blood.  Covenants were serious business.  Cutting a heifer, goat and ram into two pieces would not have been pretty, clean work.  Effort was required, blood was spilled.  The participants would be covered in blood.  But that was only the beginning.  As verse 17 shows, passing between the cut-up animals was part of the deal, too.  It was what we would think of as the signature on a contract – it was what made it binding.  It was a way of saying, “If I don’t keep my end of this bargain, you can cut me up and do to me the same thing we’ve done to these animals.”

But on the night God made this covenant with Abram, only the flaming torch passed between the pieces.  Only God walked that pathway – not Abram.  God knew full well that Abram could not keep a covenant any more than we’ve kept our covenant to obey God.  So God took the full responsibility for the covenant upon Himself, freeing us.

Switch scenes to Good Friday: “And when human hands fastened the divine hands to a cross with spikes, it wasn’t the soldiers who held the hands of Jesus steady.  It was God who held them steady.  For those wounded hands were the same invisible hands that had carried the firepot and the torch two thousand years earlier.  They were the same hands that had brought light into Abraham’s thick and dreadful darkness.  They had come to do it again.” – Max Lucado, Six Hours One Friday
God kept His word.  Except this time, the bloody carcass wasn’t a heifer, goat or ram.  It was His own.

Prayer: Great covenant-keeping God, we prostrate ourselves before your greatness and glory, in awe of your love.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 4/16/19 – Easter and Rejection

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DayBreaks for 4/16/19: Easter and Rejection

From the DayBreaks archive, April 2009:

Can you remember how it felt the first time you were rejected?  It may have been that you weren’t “wanted” on the team.  It may have been the first time you asked out that little red-headed, freckle faced girl and she turned up her nose at you and said (loudly!): “Eewwww!  I’d never go out with you!”  Rejection hurts.  Rejection hammers at the spirit and the heart and hope.  Rejection is a killer.

The woman was from Samaria.  She knew all about rejection.  She’d been married 5 times – and she’d heard the door slammed behind her 5 times as her husband of the moment threw her out and yelled at her, “And don’t come back!”  Even her friends had rejected her – after all, it could damage one’s reputation to hang out with such a woman who seemed not to have any scruples or moral fiber.  And so, when she went to the well, she went alone, carrying her water jar on her shoulder.  It was in the blazing heat of the day – so strong was her rejection by others that she didn’t dare go in the cool of the morning when other women would go – no, they wanted nothing to do with her, no matter if her heart cried out for someone, anyone, to care. 

Only on this day, there’s a man at the well.  She wonders if she will be safe.  Could he be violent?  A bandit, or even worse, a rapist waiting to fall upon a woman alone?  She proceeds, and when she gets there, this man looks at her and in a pleasant voice, asks for water, but she still was suspicious that he might have had something else in mind.  She was partly right – for he begins to ask her questions that plumbed the depth of her lonely, aching heart that had known so much rejection.  He even knew about her past…and yet he spoke to her with a tone of respect.  And then he offered her something that could quench the burning, not in her throat, but in her soul. 

As the questioning proceeded, she must have expected more rejection once she told him about her checkered past.  But she didn’t get criticism or any kind of lecture.  Jesus hadn’t come to the well seeking perfection, but honesty.  And finally, she said that she didn’t know where to go to find God, unaware He was talking with her that very moment.  Can you imagine the smile that crept across Jesus’ face and heart as he heard those words?  Here he was, in Samaria – and he’d found a hungry, thirsty heart for God.  And, it was not just any Samaritan, it was a woman.  And who would have thought that a 5-time “loser” in marriage would be so thirsty for God?  Jesus did.  This was perhaps the most outcast and rejected person in the area. 

And then a remarkable thing happened.  Jesus said to her, “I AM the Messiah.”  He could have gone to Rome and told that to Caesar and made Caesar bow down when he heard the words.  He could have gone to Herod and told him that He was the real King.  He could have gone to the religious leaders and told them the truth and opened their eyes and made believers out of them.  But he didn’t.  He revealed himself to the most rejected, broken, outcast person of all.

But what we often miss in this story is what happens next.  The woman got up, raced off and told others.  What is significant is what she left behind.  She left behind the water jar, to be sure – Scripture says so.  This water jar is a symbol of all the burden of shame, guilt and rejection she’d felt for year after year after long, lonely year.  She left it behind and ran into the town to talk to others – something she wouldn’t have dared do before coming to the well and meeting Jesus.  Why?  Because the very One who had the most right to reject her was the One that she discovered loved her the most.

Are you feeling rejected this Easter season?  Meet Jesus at the cross.  Let the one who was despised and rejected fill you with the Living Water.  The one who wouldn’t let this woman be alone in her rejection take you in his embrace and give you the love and welcome that you are so thirsty to find.  Let your rejection be healed by his welcome!

Prayer: Hallelujah, for Jesus is the friend of sinners, unafraid to meet us in our loneliness and rejection, the One who speaks words of life into the most shattered heart!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 4/15/19 – Easter and Disappointment

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DayBreaks for 4/15/19: Easter and Disappointment

From the DayBreaks archive, April 2009:

When was the last time you were disappointed? My guess is that you are disappointed in some things every day.  I know I am.  I think of the story of the disciples on the Emmaus road.  As they trudged along on their way, the disappointment drips from their lips like honey from the honeycomb.  But we were hoping that it was He who was going to redeem Israel. Indeed, besides all this, it is the third day since these things happened. (Lk. 24:21, NASB)
But we were hoping…hopes are now dashed, broken into pieces like shattered glass.  Their disappointment was so deep that they couldn’t even recognize that the One of whom they were speaking was walking beside them.  As Max Lucado points out in He Still Moves Stones, “Disappointment will do that to you.  It will blind you to the very presence of God.  Discouragement turns our eyes inward.  God could be walking next to us, but despair clouds our vision.  Despair does something else…it hardens our hearts.  We get cynical.  We get calloused.  And when good news comes, we don’t want to accept it for fear of being disappointed again.” 

You may be disappointed right now about your job, your marriage, your children or yourself.  There are several things to note about the Emmaus’ disciples and their encounter with Jesus that might be instructive:

FIRST: they kept walking and they talked about their disappointments.  They didn’t try to hide them – in fact, it seems that their disappointment was so palpable that they couldn’t NOT talk about it.  But they knew what direction they were going and they kept moving.  They didn’t stop and stew in their disappointment.  They moved onward.

SECOND: it took Jesus to turn their disappointment into rejoicing and celebration.  He did that by coming to them…not once they’d already started to celebrate, but when there were at their point of deepest pain.  It was then that they needed him the most, perhaps.  On the one hand, they were blaming God for not doing what they thought He should have done or for not doing what they thought He was doing.  Many of our unfulfilled expectations we blame on God, but remember: they may just be our own expectations, created out of our own imagination and we project them onto God as His responsibility to fulfill.  They surely thought they knew what Jesus was supposed to do – and felt he’d tricked them all.  So, who else but Jesus could turn the situation around? 

THIRD: Jesus began to heal their disappointment by telling them a story: the story of God’s faithfulness and activity throughout history.  Why?  To show them that God was still in control.  Nothing is finished until God says it is finished – surely, Jesus wasn’t finished even though they thought he was.  Those who are disappointed need to remember that God is still in control.  And what can be bad about that?

If you are walking a disappointment-filled road today, keep walking and talking with Jesus about your disappointment.  He will meet you in your pain.  Let the Word remind you that God is still in charge – not just of world events, but of your life and destiny.  And that’s not a bad thing to remember!

Prayer: In our disappointments, Lord Jesus, let us not just listen for your voice, but look for your face as  you walk next to us, reminding us that you know, you understand, and you have it all under control!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>