DayBreaks for 1/20/20 – The Lion Chaser’s Manifesto

Image result for lion chaser

DayBreaks for 1/20/20: The Lion Chaser’s Manifesto

From the DayBreaks Archive, January 2010:

This was sent to me by a friend and I thought it worth sharing, especially if you’re a bit down:

Quit living as if the purpose of life is to arrive safely at death. Set God-sized goals. Pursue God-ordained passions. Go after a dream that is destined to fail without divine intervention. Keep asking questions. Keep making mistakes. Keep seeking God. Stop pointing out problems and become part of the solution. Stop repeating the past and start creating the future. Stop playing it safe and start taking risks. Accumulate experiences. Consider the lilies. Criticize by creating. Find every excuse you can to celebrate everything you can. Live like today is the first day and last day of your life. Don’t let what’s wrong with you keep you from worshiping what’s right with God. Burn sinful bridges. Blaze new trails. Worry less about what people think and more about what God thinks. Don’t try to be who you’re not. Be yourself.  (Mark Batterson, author of In a Pit With a Lion On a Sunny Day)

There are so many parts of this that I find encouraging and inspiring, but perhaps the one that challenges me the most is this one: “Go after a dream that is destined to fail without Divine intervention.”

What dreams have you had in your life?  What’s become of them?  Do you still have any?  If so, what are they?  Do any of them involve God and His kingdom and your role in it? 

When it comes time to do something for God, do you purposely select something that you believe God wants you to do, but which you know has absolutely zero chance of becoming reality unless God shows up in mighty and powerful ways?  Or, do you tend to select things you think you could do on your own with maybe just a tiny bit of help from others (just in case God doesn’t show up)? 

It puts a whole new spin on faith, doesn’t it?

PRAYER: God, I confess that I’m often a coward and my faith isn’t predicated on the God I can’t see, but on my thoughts of what I think is possible.  Have mercy on us for our weak faith, and fill our hearts with not our dream, but Your dream!  Help us to dare great things with You!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 1/15/19: His DNA

Image result for dna

DayBreaks for 1/15/20: His DNA

From the DayBreaks Archive, January 2010:

Lee Eclov told this story, shared by permission of the Foote family:

“In August, 2009, we got a rather amazing email from my wife’s youngest brother, Jon. Six or seven years ago, when Jon and his wife, Lori, were working with a youth group in Nebraska, they met Amanda—a teenage girl the same age as their son, Wesley. Amanda came from a terribly abusive home and was eventually taken from her parents by the state. She has been part of Jon and Lori’s family ever since.

“After conferring with their two sons, Jon and Lori legally adopted Amanda. She is 22, and her name is now Amanda Foote. She will even get a new birth certificate! Now Jon and Lori have three legal heirs, and Amanda has two new brothers. She no longer has any legal claim upon her former parents, who disowned her—nor they upon her. The process was relatively simple.

“They had thought of Amanda as their daughter for a long time, but I asked if anything felt different after that day at the courthouse. Jon said, “Absolutely! When it was official there was a huge change in Lori and me—sort of like when you see your newborn for the first time. And for Amanda, there was a change in her, too. Now she knew she belonged. She knew we were her parents.”

“The beauty of it all made me offer a word of thanks to the way-clearing of our Elder Brother Jesus, God’s Beloved Son. God has given us a new name (his), a new legal standing (we are his responsibility and his heirs), and a new family (brothers and sisters in Christ, and God as our true Father). But God went even further. He gave us something that Jon and Lori can’t give Amanda. God gave us his Holy Spirit. In some ways it’s like God gives us his DNA. But even more than that, God implants in us his heart, his mind, his passion, his holiness—and people even look at us and say, “My how you bear a striking resemblance to your Father!”

Today in courts all over the world, DNA is used to prove relationships or identity.  When you think about it, isn’t that what the Holy Spirit is within us?  In him you also, when you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, and believed in him, were sealed with the promised Holy Spirit, who is the guarantee of our inheritance until we acquire possession of it, to the praise of his glory. – Ephesians 1:13-14 Our inheritance is assured because of our Paternity, and the Holy Spirit is the guarantee, the identifying method if you will, that shows we are His.

PRAYER: Thank You, Lord, for the incomparable gift of your Holy Spirit that You have placed within us.  Teach us to hear His voice and follow His leading!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 1/13/20 – The Possibility of Miracles

Image result for miracles

DayBreaks for 1/13/20: The Possibility of Miracles

From the DayBreaks Archive, January 2010:

Miracles.  We talk about them, I know folks who claim to have seen them.  More often than not, they are talking about someone being healed from an illness or disease, or the miracle of birth or conception, of human development.  It is hard to prove whether such was a miracle or a “co-incidence” in practicality.  In fact, there are those who tend to put a lot of faith in science who say that there is no such thing as a miracle. 

There is no Christian belief without faith in miracles: creation, the virgin birth, Jesus’ resurrection from the dead…these form the very crux of Christianity and its beliefs.  Science rejects that miracles can be harmonized with a modern, educated and rational view of the world.  So, once armed with that conclusion, they turn to the bible and say it can’t be reliable because of its insistence on miracles and a God of the miraculous.  The thinking goes like this: “Science has proven that there is no such thing as miracles.”  But, as Timothy Keller put it in The Reason for God, “..embedded in such a statement is a leap of faith.  It is one thing to say that science is only equipped to test for natural causes and cannot speak to any others.  It is quite another to insist that science proves that no other causes could possibly exist…The scientist must always assume there is a natural cause.  That is because natural causes are the only kind its methodology can address.  It is another thing to insist that science has proven there can’t be any other kind.  There would be no experimental model for testing the statement: ‘No supernatural causes for any natural phenomenon is possible.’  It is therefore a philosophical presupposition and not a scientific finding.”

Alvin Plantinga, the Christian philosopher, shows the folly of such a line of thinking when he wrote: “Macquarrie perhaps means to suggest that the very practice of science requires that one reject the idea of God raising someone from the dead…[This] argument…is like the drunk who insisted on looking for his lost care keys only under the streetlight on the grounds that the light was better there.  In fact, it would go the drunk one better: it would insist that because the keys would be hard to find in the dark, they must be under the light.”

It is ludicrous to think that science is so smart that it holds all the answers – even to things that cannot be put under a microscope or subjected to scientific methodology. 

Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools.  (Romans 1:22)

PRAYER: Thank you that there are reasons to walk by faith and not by sight alone!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 1/10/20 – The Utter Futility

Image result for existence

DayBreaks for 1/10/20: The Utter Futility

From the DayBreaks Archive, January 2010:

While there are many who claim not to believe in God, my guess is that most of them wish they could believe in a God.  Consider these words, respectively, from Somerset Maugham (The Summing Up) and Jean-Paul Sarte (Nausea):

“If one puts aside the existence of God and the survival after life as too doubtful…one has to make up one’s mind as to the use of life.  If death ends all, if I have neither to hope for good nor to fear evil, I must ask myself what I am here for, and how in these circumstances I must conduct myself.  Now the answer is plain, but so unpalatable that most will not face it.  There is no meaning for life, and [thus] life has no meaning.” – Somerset Maugham

“It was true, I had always realized it – I hadn’t any ‘right’ to exist at all.  I had appeared by chance, I existed like a stone, a plant, a microbe.  I could feel nothing to myself but an inconsequential buzzing.  I was thinking…that here we are eating and drinking, to preserve our precious existence, and that there’s nothing, nothing, absolutely no reason for existing.” – Jean-Paul Sarte 

I must confess that I think from a more-or-less Christian viewpoint and I realize that many in this world can’t understand my way of thinking about life and purpose and meaning.  Still, who would rather opt for the mindset of Misters Maugham or Sarte?  Who wants to live a life of absolute, sub-zero emptiness without any reason? 

It is true that no one can “prove” God’s existence.  I suppose that on the day He returns, there will still be those who will try to deny the Reality with which they are confronted – thinking that it is the product of some strange chemical reaction in their mind.  But it won’t be.  It will be real – HE will be real.  While we can prove the existence of what we call oxygen and hydrogen, we can’t prove the existence of the soul, nor of the Divine. 

Once more, I think C.S. Lewis can be informative for us when it comes to God’s existence.  He said, “…as I believe the sun has risen, not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.”  Timothy Keller, in The Reason for God, continued: “Imagine trying to look directly at the sun in order to learn about it.  You can’t do it.  It will burn out your retinas, ruining your capacity to take it in.  A far better way to learn about the existence, power, and quality of the sun is to look at the world it shows you, to recognize how it sustains everything you see and enables you to see it….We should not try to ‘look into the sun,’ as it were, demanding irrefutable proofs for God.  Instead we should look “at what the sun shows us.”

There is an utter futility to life that is lived in a universe where there is a God-shaped vacuum.  There is rich purpose for a life lived in awareness of His Presence.

PRAYER: Give us the ability to look at the seemingly obvious truth and to remove from our minds preconceptions that might hinder us from seeing the Light!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 1/8/20 – Bildad’s Folly

Image result for folly

DayBreaks for 1/08/20: Bildad’s Folly

From the DayBreaks Archive, January 2010:

I’m glad that I don’t have a friend like Bildad.  He’s one of the “friends” of Job who came to “help” their friend in the midst of untold misery.  Fat lot of help he was!

Here’s just a tiny bit of Bildad’s “comfort” to Job: “If you will look to God and plead with the Almighty, if you are pure and upright, even now he will rouse himself on your behalf.” (Job 8:5-6)  This comes after Job has talked about how he offered sacrifices to God, and Bildad jumps on that, saying in effect, “Job, it’s clear to everyone apparently but you, that your first sacrifices to God didn’t work.  It probably wasn’t the sacrifices that were wrong, I’d be willing to bet that the problem was you, Job.  Before you go back and try to offer sacrifices to please God again, dig deep into your heart and get right with him and maybe if you’re lucky, he’ll hear you this time and have mercy on you once you are pure and upright.”

As Mike Mason points out in The Gospel According to Job, “Significantly, Bildad makes the cardinal blunder of thinking that one must be pure before he can approach God.  Jesus exposed the folly of this when He taught, it is not the healthy that need a doctor, but the sick.” 

What would it be like if we had to be pure before we could approach God, before we could cry out to Him, “Lord, save me!”?  It’s not a pretty picture, is it?

PRAYER: Thank You for meeting us where we are, full of our sin and brokenness, full of disease of physical and spiritual natures.  Thank You for the healing You give to our souls!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 1/06/20 – The Ten Trillion Dollar Question

Image result for huge stacks of money

DayBreaks for 1/06/20: The $10 Trillion Dollar Question

From the DayBreaks Archive, January 2010:

What is the most important question that has ever crossed your mind?  As with all things, the answer to that would depend on who you asked and on what their experiences and beliefs are.  Many would argue that question that we all need to deal with is “Why am I here?”  That’s a good question – and it gets to the core of the issue of meaning and purpose.  It is a question that all should, yet not all do, ask of ourselves.   Sadly, many die without ever coming up with a good answer to that question. 

Another question that arguably is the most important might be “Is there a God?”  

As good of questions as those are, there is at least one that is more fundamental, because it informs the “Why am I here?” question and helps to answer it, and just knowing if there is a God or not is not enough.  It could be argued that it is more important to know what that God is like.  I think perhaps Paul asked the most important question of all in Romans 8:35 where he wrote “Can anything separates us from the love Christ has for us?”  In one of his small devotional books, Max Lucado suggests that this question really gets to the heart of what we all want to know.  How long will God’s love endure?  Can we conceive of being loved forever, or of a love lasting forever? 

But at a deeper level, we want to know that God loves us when we’re dressed in our Sunday clothes and when we’re in our dirtiest clothes.  Here’s some of Max’s thoughts: “I want to know (deep within, don’t we all really want to know?), how does God feel about me when I’m a jerk?  Not when I’m peppy and positive and ready to tackle world hunger.  Not then.  I know how we feels about me then.  Even I like me then.  I want to know how he feels about me when I snap at anything that moves, when my thoughts are gutter-level, when my tongue is sharp enough to slice a rock.  How does he feel about me then?…Will God stop loving me?”

We know that with other human beings there is a line that can be crossed, when it becomes obvious that the relationship has been forever changed.  Or what about the last time you drank until you passed out and threw up?  Of when your business failed or you found yourself standing at the fresh grave of your child and you cursed God in your heart or even out loud?  Does He still love you then?

Paul doesn’t ask questions that he doesn’t answer: “No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.”  And, come to think of it, that’s not really Paul’s answer at all, is it?  It’s God’s answer given to us through the pen of Paul.    

You are loved forever.  Nothing can separate you from the love of Jesus Christ for you.  Amazing, isn’t it?  That knowledge should make a difference in how you feel about yourself and others as you realize Christ loves them the same way – and in how  you feel about Christ!

PRAYER: Thank you, Christ, for your undying, unending, forever love that seeks us out and calls us home!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 1/01/20 – Seeing the Invisible

Image result for invisible

DayBreaks for 1/01/20: Seeing the Invisible

From the DayBreaks Archive, 1/01/09:

Do you remember the story, The Invisible Man? I faintly remember seeing black and white TV movies or shows about it. I found the premise fascinating. For those of you who don’t remember it, a man had become invisible (I don’t remember how), and he wore clothes and bandages over his head to hide the fact that he was invisible. Of course, when he took the bandages off, there was a gap between his hat and his shirt collar! Most of us have probably wished at times that we could be invisible. It may have been when we were in trouble, or when we were feeling mischievous.

Have you ever seen anything that is invisible? I haven’t. But the Bible claims that it has happened. Listen to Hebrews 11:27-28 as it describes Moses: By faith he left Egypt, not fearing the king’s anger; he persevered because he saw him who is invisible.  I’m sure that the writer to the Hebrews had Ex. 33:20-23 in mind when he wrote this, but I think there are several lessons here to be learned:

FIRST: Moses left Egypt on less than good terms. He wasn’t afraid of the pharaoh and his anger (according to this passage), but the thing that allowed Moses to continue on until he died was seeing things that were invisible. It gave him the power to persevere. Many times when my life is frantic and falling into disarray and I think I can’t bear another day, it is because I have only been looking at visible things and stopped seeing invisible Reality.

SECOND: God wants us to see Him. In the ultimate sense, He wants us to look on His face as His child (Rev. 22:4) in heaven. But it wasn’t enough that we should see Him some day. There are some days that are so bad that we need to see Him NOW! And it is at those moments that God reveals Himself in quite unexpected ways. It may come in the form of a cool wind on a blistering hot day, it may come disguised as a kind person who gives a cup of cold water, it may come in the form of someone who has hurt us surprising us by apologizing for some mean words they said. And when we see those things, I hope we’ll see and recognize not just the physical, but the invisible Truth behind all love, kindness and forgiveness.

THIRD: God grants us glimpses of himself when we need it. But more often than not, He is cleverly disguised by human flesh. That’s how He came in the person of Jesus. That was how He revealed Himself through the prophets. And that is how He wants to reveal Himself to the world around you – by and through you: (Colossians 1:27) To them God has chosen to make known among the Gentiles the glorious riches of this mystery, which is Christ in you, the hope of glory. You see, if Christ is in you, and you are in Him, God lives within you in a real and utterly unfathomable way. I can’t see it, I can’t explain it, but God lives inside of you and me. When people see us – will they be able to identify and see the Invisible?

PRAYER: Father, may we make You visible to all who see us that they may come to know Your goodness and glory and be saved!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>