About Galen

Husband, father, grandfather who crazily loves his wife, kids and grandkids. Love dogs!!!! Photography is my #1 hobby (wish it were my profession!) Love to travel. Love to read, adventure movies (Gladiator is my #1 all-time favorite), music, golf, fishing, being outdoors in a beautiful place. If I had a super-power, I would be able to heal and stop pain. Grew up for my first 8-9 years on a farm in Iowa. Other states where I have lived in my life: Florida, California, North Carolina, Maine, Georgia. (Most of my life has been spent in various places in California.) Places out of the US I've traveled include: Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Haiti, India, England, Ireland, Wales, Ghana, Israel and Peru.. Places I'd like to go: Egypt, Spain, New Zealand, Austria, Italy, France, Greece, Machu Picchu, Antartica, Scotland, Greenland, Iceland, China, Japan.

DayBreaks for 5/20/19 – Then You Will Know

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DayBreaks for 5/20/19: Then You Will Know

Therefore, say to the Israelites: ‘I am the LORD, and I will bring you out from under the yoke of the Egyptians. I will free you from being slaves to them, and I will redeem you with an outstretched arm and with mighty acts of judgment. I will take you as my own people, and I will be your God. Then you will know that I am the LORD your God, who brought you out from under the yoke of the Egyptians.’ – Exodus 6:6-7 (NIV)

You can identify some people by their voice: Andrea Bocelli, Celine Dion, James Earl Jones.  Others you can identify by the creations they’ve left behind: Michelangelo, Dali, da Vinci.  It is important to be able to identify people one way or another: just ask Esau how he felt when his father, Isaac, was unable to distinguish between Jacob and Esau!  (I’m sure Isaac didn’t feel that great about it, either!)

Before God takes His people out of Egypt, He gave the above words to Moses, to tell the Israelites that after He’d led them out of Egypt, they would know that He was the LORD, their God.  This might seem strange – after all, were these not the descendants of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob?  Yes, they were, but let’s not forget that they been in Egypt for 400 years.  How much did God communicate with them during that time?  We have no idea, but let’s face it: for 400 years they’d been surrounded by idolatry in many forms.  It is very possible that in those 400 years that they’d nearly, if not entirely, forgotten God.  Consider, for example, that America is 235 years old and see how much our country and faith-life has changed in just 235 years.  So, it is very possible that Israel had forgotten God entirely.

Therefore, God wants to identify Himself to them again.  He could have just said, “Hi, I’m your God, the One who made promises to Abraham,” and left it at that.  But He didn’t.  He knew that people (like you and me and the Israelites) would probably demand more proof.  And so He offered it to them (paraphrasing): “After I’ve led you out from under Egyptian oppression and done mighty and wonderful things, then you will know that I’m who I said – the Lord your God.”

Here’s the point: God made the proof of who He was conditional on doing something that no one else could have done – delivered a rag-tag group of slaves from the mightiest nation on earth without so much as a sword or a bow and arrow. 

God was willing to prove who He was in ways that no one else could provide.  God is always doing things that no one else can do.  Consider the kinds of things that He has done to show you who He is.  And then give Him glory!

Prayer: You have brought each of us out of slavery to the glory of Your Name!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

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DayBreaks for 5/17/18 – Only One Qualification

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DayBreaks for 5/17/19: Only One Qualification

I have been working pretty much full time for 46 years. While I think I’ve had a tremendous life, I am tired. Many of my friends are retired and I have strong hopes of joining them one of these days, but not yet.

My guess is that you’re tired, too. Physically we scurry around like squirrels, hoping to find that one more bit of something to fulfill our seemingly insatiable wants and needs. We work hard. We play hard. And we’re tired as a result.

Physical tiredness is one thing – and it seems to be an inevitable part of getting older as I can attest. But the worst tiredness is brought about by worry, fear and relationships. We worry about the stock market and our portfolios. We worry if we’ll have war with Iran. We worry about the intentions of North Korea. We worry about the politics in our own country and what the future may hold. We worry about our health. We worry about our kids and grandkids and other loved ones. We get frustrated by our relationships many times and wonder if we can ever be happy. The newspapers and nightly news only feed this tiredness.

Perhaps that’s why this promise of Jesus is so meaningful: Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. – Matt. 11:28-29 (ESV)

It is soul tiredness that wears on us. Jesus doesn’t say that we can find rest if we bring a large enough portfolio to him first. There is only one qualification: that we are weary and in our weariness we come to him.

How does he alleviate our weariness? By telling us we can trust his promises, that God knows our needs and will meet them. By telling us we don’t have to worry about the events of the world or the future because it is all going to work out according to his plan – his good and perfect plan. By telling us that we are his children and there’s a dwelling place that the Carpenter himself has made for us just waiting around the next bend. 

PRAYER: Jesus, thank you for this great invitation! Give us the wisdom to understand that rest won’t come to us until we come to you. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 5/16/19 – God’s Intent

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DayBreaks for 5/16/19: God’s Intent

From the DayBreaks archive, May 2009:

Good intentions.  My goodness, I’ve certainly had enough of them to last a lifetime.  Do those intentions always translate into right actions?  Well, um, no.  But just because the action didn’t follow the intent, it doesn’t mean that anything was wrong with the intent.  It’s the execution of a good intention that leads to good actions.

There is an interesting passage in Ephesians that speaks about one of God’s intentions.  Here it is: His intent was that now, through the church, the manifold wisdom of God should be made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly realms, according to his eternal purpose which he accomplished in Christ Jesus our Lord. – Ephesians 3:10-11 (NIV)

Maybe it seems strange to think of it in this way, but at least for the present time, God’s intentions don’t always work out, either.  They will eventually, but in the meantime, they can get sidetracked, too.  They don’t get sidetracked because God changes His mind or because He can’t execute His plan.  It’s just that He chooses to make some of His intentions intertwined with the actions of human beings like us.  And that’s why His intentions don’t always get fulfilled right away.

It was God’s “intent” that His wisdom should show forth God’s wisdom.  How is your church doing at showing forth God’s wisdom?  But let’s make it a bit more personal than that…for we are the church.  The question could therefore be asked, “How well am I doing at letting God’s manifold wisdom be seen through my life?” 

Many churches are too busy fussing and fighting to show much of anything that would resemble God’s character.  But when a diverse group of people can not only co-exist, but love one another and let God’s wisdom (not the wisdom of the church leaders) be seen – then something amazing happens.  People in this world see something that doesn’t come from this world: God’s wisdom.  Even then, however, this display of wisdom from the church isn’t primarily for human eyes – it is for the rulers and authorities in the heavenly realms.  They are watching – and believe it or not, they see the wisdom of God in His plan to involve humans as His family.

You are the church.  Does your life showcase your wisdom, or His? 

Prayer: Father, forgive us for our foolishness and for wanting to show how smart and wise we are in our human thinking.  May we live as your church so that the angels and demons give You praise for Your wisdom in creating the church!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 5/15/19 – It Is Always Morning

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DayBreaks for 5/15/19: It Is Always Morning

From the DayBreaks archive, May 2009, Michael Card’s email devotion, Devotions From the Studio:

I, Jesus, have sent my angel to give you this testimony for the churches. I am the Root and the Offspring of David, and the bright Morning Star. – Revelation 22:16

“In astronomy, the morning star is not a star at all, but actually the planet Venus. For a portion of the year, Venus appears early in the morning, just before sunrise, only to be overcome by the light of the sun as it moves behind our star in its orbit. During this time, it is referred to as the “morning star.” Later, it can be seen just before sunset, going down early in the evening, hence the term “evening star.” Venus is unmistakable, the third brightest object in the sky. Only the sun and moon outshine it.

“It is always darkest before the dawn,” Thomas Fuller wrote in 1650. Nothing could be truer. While Venus is known as both the evening and the morning star, in Scripture the term “morning star” is the only one used in reference to Jesus. This is because it is in the morning that we most need light. Despite the growing light of dawn, many times mornings can be the darkest time of the day. Sometimes it is not easy to find the courage to embrace all that lies before us in the new day. So many worries and fears can assail us in these early morning hours. We can find ourselves living in dread of the hours before us. To face the new day with joy requires a courage that must come from outside ourselves.

“If this is a dark morning for you, if you feel in need of light in your life, begin with this passage from the prophet. It represents a small flickering flame: I see Him, but not now, I behold Him, but not near – A Star shall rise out of Jacob.  – Numbers 24:17

“Then listen to the simple words of the Morning Star, the true Light Bearer, and allow them to transform the darkness into a new morning for you: I am the Light of the World.  He who follows Me will not walk in darkness, but will have the Light of Life.”  – John 8:12

Galen’s Thought: Even though Venus is referred to as both the “morning star” and the “evening star”, Jesus is never referred to by both terms.  With Jesus it is always about the dawning and presence of Light, not the setting or disappearing of the light, hence, “the bright and morning star” and never the “evening star”.  What this says about Jesus is significant, and only goes to back up His self-proclamation, “I am the Light of the World.” 

May your day be filled with His Light this day and always!

Prayer: Thank You for the Light that is Jesus, the Bright and Morning Star, who shines in the heavens without parallel!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 5/14/19 – Trading on God’s Mercy

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DayBreaks for 5/14/19: Trading on God’s Mercy

John 8:35-36 (ESV) – The slave does not remain in the house forever; the son remains forever. So if the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed.

Yesterday I wrote about verse 36 and how the Son gives true freedom – a truly encouraging truth But immediately preceding that statement, Jesus gives a stern warning. There is a difference between a slave and a family member.

As William Barclay points out, Jesus is making a not-too-subtle threat here, one his audience, the Jews, would easily grasp: “The word slave reminds him that in any household there is a difference between the slave and the son. The son is a permanent dweller in the household, but the slave can be ejected at any time. In effect Jesus is saying to the Jews: ‘You think that you are sons in God’s house and that nothing, therefore, can ever banish you from God. Have a care; by your conduct you are making yourselves slaves, and the slave can be ejected from the master’s presence at any time.’ Here is a threat. It is a terrible thing to trade on the mercy of God—and that is what the Jews were doing.”

There is warning here for more than the Jews – it is for us, too.

At the same time, for followers of Christ, in spite of the fact that we are still entranced by sin in our flesh, that sin has been paid for and we are no longer slaves, or even servants, but called friends and sons and daughters. As sons and daughters we have a position in the family of God that is permanent.

PRAYER: Thank you for adopting us as sons and daughters with the full privileges and security of being members of your family. Let us live in that truth! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 5/13/19 – Forever Freed

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DayBreaks for 5/13/19: Forever Freed

John 8:36 (ESV) – So if the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed.

“Freedom!” It echoed from the lips of William Wallace and countless men and women throughout history. Freedom is precious – and it is something that the oppressed long for. Countless lives have been lost in pursuit of freedom.

In the context of today’s verse, the Jews claimed that they had never been the slaves of any man. That, technically, is not true. They were enslaved many times throughout their history, but their fierce determination to be free led them to stretch the truth in their statement to Jesus.  

It wasn’t so much slavery to other persons that Jesus was talking about. He was talking about something much more difficult. He was talking about enslavement to sin. But as William Barclay put it, we often say or think, “Surely I can do what I like with my own life.” He goes on: “But the point is that the man who sins does not do what he likes; he does what sin likes. A man can let a habit get such a grip of him that he cannot break it. He can allow a pleasure to master him so completely that he cannot do without it. He can let some self-indulgence so dominate him that he is powerless to break away from it. He can get into such a state that in the end, as Seneca said, he hates and loves his sins at one and the same time. So far from doing what he likes, the sinner has lost the power to do what he likes. He is a slave to the habits, the self-indulgences, the wrong pleasures which have mastered him. This is precisely Jesus’ point. No man who sins can ever be said to be free.”

What does slavery to sin mean? It means we’re enslaved to it’s power to overrule our own best intention to be obedient. It means we’re trapped in a cesspool of shame, guilt, embarrassment and regret.

As we often hear, “Freedom is not free”, meaning that there is always a price that is paid for freedom, and freedom from sin is no exception to that rule.

Do you long to be free from your guilt, shame and regret? You don’t need to be if you are a child of the King. If the Son has set you free, Jesus himself says that you are truly free. No need to carry those things on your shoulders for one more moment. Trust his promise. He who set you free and paid the price for that freedom is honored when you trust that he is as good as his word.

Prayer: For the freedom you purchased for us, Jesus, we humbly thank you!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 5/10/19 – We Just Don’t Get It

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DayBreaks for 5/10/19: We Just Don’t Get It

From the DayBreaks archive: May 2009

In 2004, Daniel Meyer wrote: “Years ago I traveled to Ecuador and spent a couple of weeks traveling in the mountains. The Quechua Indian people I met there lived amidst the most mind-numbing squalor. The disease and disfigured bodies were heartbreaking. The bugs and stench were everywhere. People were living in a hole in the ground and calling it a house. They were feeding on rotten food and prizing garbage as possessions. But they didn’t know it. Why? Because everyone lived that way. They had never been given a picture of what it means to be a genuinely healthy human being. They did not know what an abundant life truly looked like.

“That is our problem, too. It’s the reason we think of ourselves as largely innocent people—people who have little to do with bringing about the Cross of Christ. We don’t get how sick and undeveloped we are spiritually. In Psalm 14, David says that the one fully-healthy Being in the universe views the human race as we might view those Quechua villagers—only the gap between his life and that of our village is so much larger. The Lord looks down from heaven on the sons of men to see if there are any who understand, any who seek God. But all have turned aside. They have together become corrupt. There is no one who does good, not even one. (Ps. 14) In other words, we are condemned, and we don’t even know it.”

I think Mr. Meyer is correct: we are just as ignorant of what a truly abundant life looks like as the Quechua Indians are about what life in America might look like.  There is absolutely no way that they can imagine or picture freeways, cars, grocery stores stocked with food, doctor’s offices and hospitals that can assist in God’s healing.  They cannot imagine what lurks in the water they drink because they’ve never seen a microscope and know nothing of bacteria and viruses. 

We, perhaps, do a have bit better idea of what an abundant life looks like, because we can look at the life of Jesus and get an idea.  Jesus certainly lived an abundant life – and we’ll note that it had nothing to do with cars, stocked shelves of foodstuffs or even physical well-being.  Abundant life, from the Biblical standpoint, springs from the heart that is in tune with God and His will. 

Part of the problem may also be that we seldom to take time to consider our life and compare it to what an abundant life might look like.  Again, mind you, I’m not talking about physical possessions.  Jesus put it this way: Then turning to his disciples, Jesus said, “So I tell you, don’t worry about everyday life—whether you have enough food to eat or clothes to wear. For life consists of far more than food and clothing.  Luke 12:22-23 (NLT)

Moreover the profit of the earth is for all: the king himself is served by the field. He that loveth silver shall not be satisfied with silver; nor he that loveth abundance with increase: this is also vanity.” Ecclesiastes 5:9-10 (KJV)

Then He said to them, “Beware, and be on your guard against every form of greed; for not even when one has an abundance does his life consist of his possessions.” And He told them a parable, saying, “The land of a rich man was very productive. “And he began reasoning to himself, saying, ‘What shall I do, since I have no place to store my crops?’  “Then he said, ‘This is what I will do: I will tear down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. ‘And I will say to my soul, “Soul, you have many goods laid up for many years to come; take your ease, eat, drink and be merry.”‘  “But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your soul is required of you; and now who will own what you have prepared?’ “So is the man who stores up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God.” Luke 12:15-21 (NASB)

Prayer: Jesus, lead us into true abundant life that we may be rich towards You!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>