DayBreaks for 3/31/20 – The Hallway Through the Sea #8 – Apart is Temporary, Together Is Forever

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DayBreaks for 3/31/20: The Hallway Through the Sea #8 – Apart is Temporary, Together is Forever

From Christianity Today and Tim Dalrymple, 3/30/20:

For today’s musical pairing, listen to “S.T.A.Y.” from Hanz Zimmer’s “Interstellar” soundtrack. Note that all the songs for this series have been gathered into a Spotify playlist here. See video below.

“The Spirit you received does not make you slaves, so that you live in fear again; rather, the Spirit you received brought about your adoption to sonship. And by him we cry, ‘Abba, Father.’” – Romans 8:15

“Amen. Come, Lord Jesus.” – Revelation 22:20

Day 9. 775,306 confirmed cases, 37,083 deaths globally.

My youngest daughter was born on the other side of the world to a family I never met. Since her heart had not formed properly, she was left in a baby safe-house outside an orphanage and eventually found her way to people who produced the funding needed for life-saving surgery. Americans and Chinese, most of them followers of Jesus, helped her heal and grow.

She was three years old when her picture appeared on our Facebook feed. She needed a home and a “forever family.” My wife and I did not need to make a decision. We simply recognized our daughter.

Adoption is a mysterious thing. It’s not a resolution to form something new. It’s a realization that something beautiful was already formed, and we are only now beginning to realize it. My wife fought like a lioness to bring her home. “My child is stuck in another country,” she said. Our little girl called me Baba (“daddy”) when we spoke across computer screens. Although we started on opposite sides of the planet, separated by oceans and borders and languages and cultures, somehow she was a part of our family from the very beginning.

So we made our way around the world and found a little girl who was 37 inches and 39 pounds of laughter and energy and determined affection. Then we brought her home. We were apart for a little while, and now we are forever family.

You say, O Lord, we are adopted. As we watch the virus reaching swiftly across the face of the Earth, as we see it take root more firmly in our own soil, we take comfort that you have made us your children.

When you look upon us, you do not see strangers. You see your sons and daughters. You loved us before we knew you existed. You see our suffering… (Click this link to read the rest of the meditation.)

Link to Christianity Today’s Facebook page

The Hallway Through the Sea is a series of daily meditations from the president and CEO of Christianity Today, written specifically for those struggling through the coronavirus pandemic. It will address our sense of fear and isolation and also the ways we find beauty and truth and hope—and Christ himself—in the midst of suffering. The title of the column alludes to the passage of the Israelites through the Red Sea. We are a people redeemed from our enslavement to sin, yet we find ourselves living between where we were and where we are meant to be. Danger looms on both sides, but our hope and our faith is that God will deliver us through the sea and into the land of promise.

Timothy Dalrymple is president and CEO of Christianity Today. Follow him on Twitter @TimDalrymple_

PREVIOUS THE HALLWAY THROUGH THE SEA COLUMNS:

Out of the Depths

Chosen in the Furnace

The First Word and the Last

More . . .

Link to video with facts, symptoms and prevention tips about coronavirus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AITtaAAAdYc

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 3/19/20 – Pay Attention to the Candy

Image result for bowl of M&M's

DayBreaks for 3/19/20: Pay Attention to the Candy

From the DayBreaks archive, March 2010:

If you’ve not heard about some of the crazy demands of musicians, athletes, movie stars, etc., you’ve been away from planet Earth for a while.  Some of the requests are infamous: outlandish requirements made by music celebrities in their contracts with concert promoters are not oddities.  One of the most notorious came from the rock band Van Halen.  Each contract insisted that “a bowl of M&M’s be provided backstage, but with every single brown M&M removed.”  If the band arrived and saw that the bowl had any brown M&Ms in it, they were free to cancel the concert and receive full payment.  Who knew a bunch of hard-rockers could be such divas, right?

But wait.  There was a good reason behind the clause.  The absence of those M&Ms was a test and was put in place because even life itself could be at stake.  In his book The Checklist Manifesto, author Atul Gawande, quoting from lead singer David Lee Roth’s memoir, shares the story behind the M&Ms:

Roth explained [that] … “Van Halen was the first band to take huge productions into tertiary, third-level markets. We’d pull up with nine 18-wheeler trucks, full of gear, where the standard was three trucks, max. And there were many, many technical errors—whether it was the girders couldn’t support the weight, or the flooring would sink in, or the doors weren’t big enough to move the gear through. The contract rider read like a … Yellow Pages because there was so much equipment, and so many human beings to make it function.” So just as a little test, buried somewhere in the middle of the rider, would be Article 126, the no-brown-M&Ms clause. “When I would walk backstage, if I saw a brown M&M in that bowl,” [Roth] wrote, “well, we’d line-check the entire production. Guaranteed you’d run into a problem.” The mistakes could be life-threatening … In Colorado, the band found that the local promoters had failed to read the weight requirements and that the staging would have fallen through the arena floor.

Van Halen’s ridiculous-at-first-glance contract demand illustrates the principle from Luke 16:10: Whoever can be trusted with very little can also be trusted with much, and whoever is dishonest with very little will also be dishonest with much.

PRAYER: Keep us from thinking that our little bending of the rules and indiscretions are too small for You to notice.  Help us be faithful in ALL things!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Link to video with facts, symptoms and prevention tips about coronavirus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AITtaAAAdYc

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 3/18/20 – The Courage to Choose Freedom

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DayBreaks for 3/18/20: The Courage to Choose Freedom

From the DayBreaks archive, March 2010:

An Arab chief tells a story of a spy who was captured and then sentenced to death by a general in the Persian army. This general had the strange custom of giving condemned criminals a choice between the firing squad and the big, black door. As the moment for execution drew near, the spy was brought to the Persian general, who asked the question, “What will it be: the firing squad or the big, black door?”

The spy hesitated for a long time. It was a difficult decision. He chose the firing squad.

Moments later shots rang out confirming his execution. The general turned to his aide and said, “They always prefer the known way to the unknown. It is characteristic of people to be afraid of the undefined. Yet, we gave him a choice.”

The aide said, “What lies beyond the big door?”

“Freedom,” replied the general. “I’ve known only a few brave enough to take it.”  

It is much easier to remain enslaved than to be free.  One might think it would be the opposite – that anyone in their right mind would choose freedom over slavery.  But when we are enslaved, we don’t have to make choices, we don’t have to make decisions – we are told what to do and we have no choice but to do it. 

Perhaps that’s why so many refuse to choose the freedom that Christ offers.  When we accept the invitation to freedom, we are accepting the responsibility to imitate and live like Jesus.  Do you have the courage necessary?  Once you choose freedom in Christ, however, you are truly free!  The slave does not remain in the house forever; the son remains forever.  So if the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed. – John 8:35-36

PRAYER: For the freedom to choose, we thank You!  For real freedom through Christ, we give you praise!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Link to video with facts, symptoms and prevention tips about coronavirus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AITtaAAAdYc

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 3/16/20 – The Wimpy Legion

Image result for Roman Legion

DayBreaks for 3/16/20: The Wimpy Legion

The Roman army was organized into legions. A legion was comprised of about 6000 highly trained professional soldiers. A Roman legion was, if you will, a killing machine the likes of which the ancient world have ever seen. No one wanted to stand across the battlefield from a Roman legion. No one.

Jesus encountered a legion, too, but it wasn’t a wimpy Roman legion, it was a legion of demons and it had possessed a man and made him wild and dangerous. But there is something interesting when the encounter takes place. Even though others had tried to cast the demons out of the poor man they had utterly failed. When Jesus confronts the Legion across the battleground of the man’s soul, the Legion begins to beg. You see, the Legion of demons recognized the voice that was speaking to them and they knew the power behind the voice. In fact, the demons don’t even attempt to put up a fight against Jesus.

As interesting as this story is with the horde of demons and pigs, we miss the point of it if we don’t stay focused on the man. The point is that the may was set free. A few verses later we meet him again, sitting at Jesus feet (indicating the peace he’d been given), clothed and no longer naked (Jesus had restored the man’s dignity and taken away his shame). That is what Jesus is about – setting free those enslaved, given them peace and dignity.

We are surrounded these days with all sorts of evil – animate and inanimate. We need to be reminded that the Jesus of this story still lives, still sees, and still has that great power at his command. As coronavirus attacks our communities, so Satan attacks our souls. Both will yield at some point to the command of the Lord. Even in the midst of this virus, though, let us remain seated at Jesus’ feet, let us be at peace and walk in the dignity of those who know they are his beloved children.

Perhaps in this time of fear and uncertainty, you can help your children, your neighbors find the freedom, peace and dignity their souls seek.

Mark 5:6-9 (CSBBible) – When he saw Jesus from a distance, he ran and knelt down before him. And he cried out with a loud voice, “What do you have to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I beg you before God, don’t torment me!”
For he had told him, “Come out of the man, you unclean spirit!” “What is your name?” he asked him. “My name is Legion,” he answered him, “because we are many.”

PRAYER: Jesus, it is so comforting to know that all things will one day, instantaneously, surrender and yield to your voice. Teach us to do that each day until all things have been put forever under your feet. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Link to video with facts, symptoms and prevention tips about coronavirus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AITtaAAAdYc

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 3/11/20 – A Lesson From COVID-19

Image result for covid-19 virus

DayBreaks for 3/11/20: A Lesson from COVID-19

COVID-19 (referred to simply as coronavirus by the media) is all over the news…and virtually all over the world and spreading. While it could be much more deadly than it has been, it is still a very serious issue especially for the elderly with underlying medical issues. It seems the world is learning as it goes on this.

As I was thinking about COVID-19, I was impressed yet again with several things:

  1. How precarious life is – we read stories about disasters, about meteors that pass by the earth rather than colliding with it, about war and injustice. All these things can serve as reminders to us that our reunion with you could be just around to corner for any of us and we need to be ready to take that journey at any time;
  2. How dangerous things can be that you can’t even see with your eyes – the coronavirus is tiny – as are all viruses – and yet it has caused the death of hundreds, made over 100 thousand sick, disrupted businesses and economic systems in ways that nothing has during my life. While we may fear the hulking menace in the dark of the night – fearing we may awaken some night with them presence in our rooms – we need to understand that not all dangerous things are big.

All this caused me to think that sin is much like coronavirus. You can’t see the seed of it in the human heart, but it’s there and just waiting to break out. The things that could make us sick or us spiritually don’t usually present themselves as huge or life-shattering decisions. They start small and are maybe not even recognized in the beginning, but once the infection gets into our hearts and minds it begins to multiply – and it can be deadly. Small, seemingly innocent interactions can lead to serious issues!

Psalm 51:10 (ESV) – Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me.

PRAYER: Jesus, help us be aware of how insidious Satan and sin can be so we don’t fall into his snare. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 3/04/20 – Not Cast Down

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DayBreaks for 3/04/20 – Not Cast Down

From the DayBreaks archive, February 2010:

The steps of a good man are ordered by the LORD: and he delighteth in his way. Though he fall, he shall not be utterly cast down: for the LORD upholdeth him with his hand. Psalms 37:23-24 (KJV)

With the 2010 Winter Olympics taking place in Vancouver, Canada, February 12-28, chances are good that many of athletes performing on the biggest stage in the world will be dedicated Christians whose faith affects their preparation and participation in their specialized events. In an anthology entitled Finding God At Harvard: Spiritual Journeys of Thinking Christians, American figure skater and Harvard graduate Paul Wylie writes of his experience during a very trying moment in the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics:

“I set up for the first jump in my program, but as soon as I’m in the air, I know something is terribly wrong.  A flash later my hand touches the ice; the blade will not hold. I start slipping and now I realize it: I am falling. All I hear as I collapse to the ice is the empathetic groan of what seems like a million voices. I struggle to get up, hustling to get to the next move, thoughts racing through my mind as I try to cover the disappointments. There is no way of erasing a fall from the judge’s minds, nor can I jam the television transmissions to the living rooms of family and friends watching back home. This is live, and I have just blown it.

“I have four minutes left and one important choice to make. Either skate through the rest of the program believing that something constructive will come of the mishap, concentrating and performing through to the end, or continue to dwell on the fall and its consequences, inviting more mistakes caused by a negative frame of mind. A Scripture flashes through my mind that helps me with my decision: “The righteous shall fall, but they shall not be utterly cast down.” I suddenly grasp God’s perspective: he will use our successes and our failures to teach us about ourselves and to show the world his glory. “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.” (Romans 8:28) I move on, accepting a new role. I admit imperfection and decide to skate “heartily as unto the Lord” for God’s glory rather than my own results.

“Paul Wyle would go on to finish tenth, but his lack of success at the 1988 Games did not deter him. He continued to compete in figure skating, learning from his setback. He eventually won the silver medal at the 1992 Olympics in France.” – Jerry De Luca, Montreal West, Quebec; source: Paul Wylie, “On Gravity and Lift,” in Finding God at Harvard: Spiritual Journeys of Thinking Christians (edited by Kelly Monroe Kullberf), InterVarsity Press, 2007

It is hard to fall down and not be down cast about it.  The wonderful news is that no matter what happens to us in this life, the Lord will lift us up in due time!

PRAYER: We all face hard times, Lord, times when we fall and are badly hurt.  Bring healing to us, remind us that in You we will NEVER be “utterly cast down!”  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 3/03/20 – Peephole Driving

DayBreaks for 3/3/20: Peephole Driving

From the DayBreaks archive, February 2010:

Let me say first of all that I’ve been guilty of this:

As winter approached, USA Today writer Larry Copeland wrote a story about the danger of “peephole” driving. Anyone who lives in the frozen north has likely been a peephole driver at some point (GCD: I did it in Maine and have even done it on frosty mornings here in California!) You’re in a hurry to get somewhere and when you go out into the cold you discover your car is encased in a layer of snow, ice or frost from a storm. You put the keys in the car, crank on the ignition, and turn up the heater and defroster (that is, if you can even get in your car – one time in Maine it had warmed up enough that the snow somewhat melted from the roof of my truck and then refroze, sealing my doors tightly shut!)  Then, tired of waiting, you get out your scraper (credit cards work well in lieu of a scraper) and battle to scratch out a clear space on your windshield. After a few minutes your fingers are frozen and you’ve only managed to clear out an opening the size of a small pizza. Shivering and miserable, you realize this will take 10 more minutes but you don’t have enough time, so you move to the rear window and scrape off a smaller opening the size of a smaller personal pizza and do something similar to the side windows. Then, desperate to get going so you reach your destination on time, you throw caution to the freezing wind and get in the car and drive away.

Then it hits you: you can barely see.  You have blind spots all over because of the frost that still covers 90% of your windows.  Scared, you drive slowly and lean up close to the windshield and peer out your peephole, hoping against hope that you don’t run into anyone before the heater and defrosters melt more of the ice away from your windows. Worse yet, as you peer out your peephole, you notice that other drivers are peering out their peepholes!

Copeland’s article ends with this warning from the North Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles: “Peephole driving is an invitation to disaster.”

Peephole driving is a metaphor for trying to go through life with limited knowledge and wisdom of God’s Word.  Since one is in too much of a rush to get on with life, we may scratch a bit at the Word, but hurriedly pile into the car and head off.  The problem is that as a result of not having enough time in the Word, we lack wisdom and suffer from the limitations and inevitable pain that come from not knowing the Scriptures when if we had known them, we would have been able to avoid the car-wrecks of life in many cases.

Have you been trying to steer your own life based on your own limited perception of what is real and what really works?  If so, wait upon the Lord, let Him give you a full-field view of reality and truth so you don’t wind up in the ditch. 

Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. Psalms 119:105

PRAYER: We need to see You and believe in Your wisdom, Lord.  Help us to persevere in the study of Your Word which gives light unto our pathway!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2020 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>