DayBreaks for 4/13/20 – Random Thoughts on Easter

resurrection-morning-iis | Walnut Creek Presbyterian Church

DayBreaks for 4/13/20: Random Thoughts on Easter

NOTE: The Hallway Through the Sea will return tomorrow, but for today I want to share some quotes that are timely given the week just past.

We often speak of “God with us” at Christmas. “God with us” as a precious child in a manger is preferable to “God with us” as a despised man hung to die. But the manger is not the central symbol of our faith. The empty tomb isn’t either. Christians decided early on that the sign of their faith would be a cross.” – Daniel Harrell, Christianity Today

Galen’s Thoughts: we sing about Emmanuel at Christmas as we should. We like the thought of Jesus becoming man to show us what God is like, to know he identifies with us. The truth about Emmanuel doesn’t stop with the birth of the Messiah, though. God was with us not only in the manger and in working for a living, but in his death – as he will be with us in ours, too. Even then it isn’t finished – in fact it never will be – for he will be with us in our resurrection and then forever.

To suffer and die—whether at the end of a long life or too terribly soon—is the one way we will all be like Jesus without even trying. Paul goes so far as to say we’ve been crucified already, that as far as God goes we’re as good as dead now (Gal. 2:19–20). Paul goes on to insist we’re raised now too—buried in baptism and raised by faith (Col. 2:12). For Christians, our future is so certain it’s like we’ve died and gone to heaven already.” – Daniel Harrell, Christianity Today

Galen’s Thoughts: there is nothing wrong at all with thinking about our death in the future tense. We all have a sense – perhaps even some sort of hope – that we are immortal and that we may just happen to be the one case of a human who escapes the grasp of the grim reaper. But in our hearts, we know that’s not the case. In a deeper sense, we have died, and we have already been resurrected. Is it just wishful thinking? I don’t believe it is. We will join Jesus in death, but also in life. It is a fait accompli – as good as if it had already happened to us.

The Resurrection is not a timeless truth about the immortality of the human being, or the reassurance that everything works out in the end. The Resurrection takes place in a graveyard, a reminder that, left to ourselves, every one of us will retreat to the dust from which we came.” – Russell Moore, Christianity Today

Galen’s Thoughts: We shall return to the dust. It is only fitting that the resurrection requires graveyards. But after the resurrection happens, there will be no graveyards anymore. The fact that the Resurrection happened there was intentional and a reminder that as surely as Jesus died and rose, we shall follow in his footsteps as surely as the Son rose on Easter morning.

PRAYER: Thank you for holy week and all the reminders and lessons it has to teach us, Lord. We glorify you for your great power that defeated our gravest enemy and that promises and guarantees our greatest joy! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2020, Galen C. Dalrymple.

 

 

 

DayBreaks for 4/09/20: The Hallway Through the Sea #15 – The Resurrection Has Not Been Cancelled

Divine Intention of the Resurrection from Romans 6 - Redeemer ...

DayBreaks for 4/09/20: The Hallway Through the Sea #15 – The Resurrection has Not been Cancelled

From Christianity Today and Tim Dalrymple, 4/08/20:

For today’s musical pairing, listen to Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy,” commonly played on Easter Sunday but here rendered in a distilled, outdoor version.

“I want to know Christ—yes, to know the power of his resurrection and participation in his sufferings, becoming like him in his death, and so, somehow, attaining to the resurrection from the dead.” – Philippians 3:10–11

Meditation 15. 1,495,051 confirmed cases, 87,469 deaths globally.

Sister Benedicta Ward produced the most widely used translations of Sayings of the Desert Fathers and Lives of the Desert Fathers. I studied those works with her at her home in Oxford over the course of a beautiful spring. The books recount the practices and teachings of early Christian hermits and monks who made their homes in the most barren parts of Egypt.

I found myself in those discussions frequently referring to “dying to oneself.” Eventually she lifted her head and held up her hand. “We die to ourselves, yes,” she said. “But only so we can come alive to who we were really made to be, Christ within us.”

It was a gentle rebuke and it passed in a blink. But I have never stopped hearing those words.

In this season of affliction and this Holy Week, we approach the day on which we remember the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. With so much suffering around us and within us, it’s natural and right to reflect on the suffering of our Savior. But even in the darkest of times, we should never stay there. Jesus didn’t.

The Cross by itself is an extraordinary act of love and self-sacrifice. But it cannot be separated from the empty tomb. Apart from the empty tomb, Jesus is not a savior at all. Apart from the empty tomb, the story of the cross would be a story of the death of hope and the defeat of God.

This is not unknown to those of us who are followers of Jesus Christ. We have already experienced a foretaste of the resurrection. We have experienced Christ bringing new life—bringing his life—forth within us. We are, each of us, living proof that God brings life into the dead places. We only truly live when we die and Christ lives in us.

Church doors are closed. Schools are no longer meeting. Businesses are shuttered. Restaurants and cafés are empty, cinema screens are dark, and concert halls are silent. Countless meetings and gatherings, weddings and funerals, conferences and events have been canceled.

The resurrection is not canceled…(Click this link to read the rest of the meditation.)

PRAYER: We implore you, O Lord, bring life out of death again today. Let it start in us. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Link to Christianity Today’s Facebook page

The Hallway Through the Sea is a series of daily meditations from the president and CEO of Christianity Today, written specifically for those struggling through the coronavirus pandemic. It will address our sense of fear and isolation and also the ways we find beauty and truth and hope—and Christ himself—in the midst of suffering. The title of the column alludes to the passage of the Israelites through the Red Sea. We are a people redeemed from our enslavement to sin, yet we find ourselves living between where we were and where we are meant to be. Danger looms on both sides, but our hope and our faith is that God will deliver us through the sea and into the land of promise. If you wish, you can follow Timothy Dalrymple on Twitter @TimDalrymple_

PREVIOUS THE HALLWAY THROUGH THE SEA MEDITATIONS:

Out of the Depths

Chosen in the Furnace

The First Word and the Last

More . . .

 

DayBreaks for 3/31/18 – Saturday, the Glorious Silence

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DayBreaks for 3/30/18: Saturday – the Glorious Silence

From the Perimeter holy week devotion guide, by Caleb Click:

1 Corinthians 15:3-5 (ESV) – For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, and that he appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve.

“Buried.” In our Easter celebrations, the death and resurrection of Jesus receive most of our attention and with good reason. The heart and soul of the Christian faith rests on those realities. But here, in 1 Corinthians 15, Paul says that it was of first importance not only that Jesus died and rose, but that he was buried. Christians across the centuries have echoed those words of Paul in the Apostle’s Creet, saying with one voice, …he was crucified, died, and was buried. Sitting at the very center of it all is this reality often confessed but rarely considered: that Jesus’ body joined bullions before him in a tomb, that he entered the grave and for three days remained inside, closed off from the world of the living. But why? Why does this matter?

But this mystery doesn’t stop there. It sweeps us up with it. Romans 6:4 says: We were buried with him by baptism into his death.  Colossians 2:12 announces that we who are in Christ have been buried with him in baptism.  In the gospel story, Saturday’s mourning has as much importance to us as Friday evening’s despair and Sunday morning’s joy. Again, the question: why?

I think the answer is this: burial is a goodbye. It’s recognition that the life of the one we loved is gone and what remains in their place is only silence That the words they once spoke live on only in our recollection. That their touch exists only in memory. That the person with all their vitality and power is gone. Saturday morning is the disciples’ coming to terms with a Jesus they think is no more.

And here is why that matters, why it’s such gloriously good news. Jesus wasn’t simply a man who died; he was the spotless lamb upon whom our sins were laid (John 1:29). The disciples mourned on Saturday, but they didn’t realize that it wasn’t Jesus who was no more; it was our sin. It was everything we once were. When he rose Sunday morning and left the tomb, our sins stayed inside. Buried. Silenced. A memory and recollection stripped of its power. We don’t continue in sin because we were buried with Jesus and, while we have been raised, the old man still lies buried in that tomb, never to leave again (Romans 6). We don’t fall captive to the lie of thi world that our hope is in our performance, because the body of flesh was cut away and cast into a tomb from which it will never escape, and we now stand in the resurrection life of Jesus Christ (Colossians 3).

TODAY’S PRAYER: Father, we recognize that the burial of Jesus was a goodbye. A goodbye to our sin and its condemnation. To the person we were before Christ. To the life we once lived and the power the flesh once had over us. Thank you that the glorious good news of a silence does not leave us in pain as the disciples first thought, but one that truly makes us free. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

COPYRIGHT 2018 by Galen C. Dalrymple. All rights reserved.

DayBreaks for 3/27/16 – Rolling Stones and Broken Things

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DayBreaks for 3/27/16 – Rolling Stones and Broken Things

In the city of Jerusalem is a first century tomb that clearly demonstrates the type of tomb that must have been Joseph of Arimathea’s family crypt. I took the photo in January when we visited this site as the very last location on our Israel tour. The sun was setting and it was chill but there was an excitement about what I was seeing.

I know that this wasn’t the tomb of Jesus…it is believed, as I recall, to have been related in some way to the family of a priest in the first century, though I could have a flawed memory. It doesn’t matter, really…but the tomb ignited my imagination as I contemplated what happened both inside and outside a similar tomb in that same city about 2000 years ago. Though now stuck with mud and the detritus of centuries, the stone will no longer roll to the right to close the entrance to the tomb that is below the archway. But in my mind’s eye, I imagined what it must have been like when that stone outside of Jesus’ tomb began to move.

A few days earlier, a man from Nazareth had been crucified and his body wrapped and stuck into a tomb like this one. But by the Sunday following, he wasn’t there any more. As Christians, we believe he rose. But why was he in the tomb in the first place?  Let me share with you a devotion that one of the worship leaders at our church, Laura Story Elvington, wrote this week:

“And he began to speak to them in parables. “A man planted a vineyard…” – Mark 12:1
“Though Scripture doesn’t give us a play by play of every moment between Palm Sunday and Easter, we are given some insight into what Jesus’ last days on this earth looked like. Every word He speaks is heavy with significance, knowing that these are His last words spoken to crowds, His last meals shared with friends and, in this case, His last parable shared in the temple.
“As this story unfolds, we learn that there was a vineyard, and its owner leased it to tenants to work while he was away. When harvest season came, the owner sent a servant to collect some fruit, which was his rightful due as the owner, but the tenants beat the servant and mistreated him. So the owner sent another servant, and then another, one was severely beaten and the other was killed. “Finally, the owner sent his beloved son, saying “Surely they will respect my son”. But the tenants plotted, saying, “This is his heir. Let us kill him and the inheritance will be ours!” So the tenants killed the owner’s son. So what is the owner to do now? Jesus tells the captivated crowd that, “the owner will destroy the tenants and give the vineyard to others.”
“Now why did Jesus tell this story? The religious leaders who heard it, felt as though Jesus was speaking about them. They had been given God’s people to care for, yet their greatest concern was their own religiosity. Its also served to foreshadow the atrocity that the Pharisees would perform only days later. But there was another audience present that day the “others.” The commoners. The crowd. Basically, you and me. They listened to Jesus’s teaching, wondering if it could be true. Could the Kingdom of God be given to the not-so-spiritual? “Could the poor have a share in His vineyard? Could those with no status or no title be named the new heirs of such a treasure?
“This is the story of the gospel, told only days before being enacted with real blood, real nails and real thorns. Jesus died, truly paying it all, so that we could gain it all. This is amazing grace: that we, whose sin nailed Him to the tree, also partake in the glory that awaited Him.
“My three year old, Josie, and I were walking on the beach a few days ago, collecting shells to take home to her friends. After digging around and finding some real gems, I noticed that the ones she chose were only fragments, and nothing anyone would want to receive as a gift. “You can have these that I’ve found”, I said to her. “They are much prettier.” But she just smiled and replied, “I like the broken ones.” I smiled.
“This is the beauty of the gospel: God doesn’t owe us the vineyard. And we don’t deserve the vineyard. But, Praise God, we get the vineyard. Why? Because He likes the broken ones.
“Father thank you for the treasure given to us through the finished work of Christ, and making us joint heirs with him. You have made the broken wholly beautiful.”

DayBreaks for 03/29/13 – The Miracle of Saturday

DayBreaks for 03/29/13 – The Miracle of Saturday                     

Untitled-1Mark 15:46 (ESV) – And Joseph bought a linen shroud, and taking him down, wrapped him in the linen shroud and laid him in a tomb that had been cut out of the rock. And he rolled a stone against the entrance of the tomb.

There are apocryphal writings that purport to describe the “lost years of Jesus.”  They tell of ridiculous, fanciful events that tickle the fancy of critics and fans of Christ alike.  Some seem almost plausible, but others are, well, ridiculous.  There’s a good reason they weren’t included in the canon!

We don’t know much about the first 30 years of Jesus life.  They are a mystery.  We can imagine him working in the carpentry shop, most likely providing for his mother and younger siblings.  Someday we can ask Him about those years, but not now.  They are lost to us for now.

One of the strangest days in Jesus’ life had to be the day between Friday and Sunday – the Saturday of Holy Week.  Again today I turn to John Ortberg’s book, Who Is This Man?:

“From a human standpoint, we think of the miraculous day as Sunday, the day the man Jesus is risen from the dead.  I wonder if, from Heaven’s standpoint, the great miracle isn’t on Saturday.  When Jesus is born, the skies are filled with the heavenly hosts praising God because that baby is Emmanuel, God with us.  Somehow Go din a manger, somehow God in a stable, somehow God on earth.  Now on Saturday, the angels look down and see what?  God in a tomb.  The miracle of Sunday is that a dead man lives.  The  miracle of Saturday is that the eternal Son of God lies dead. 

“So Jesus Christ defeats our great enemy death not by proclaiming his invincibility over it but by submitting himself to it.  If you can find this Jesus in a grave, if you can find him in death, if you can find him in hell, where can you not find him?  Where will he not turn up?”

Excellent question…

PRAYER: Lord, there are days when we act like we think you’re still in the tomb and that you are gone forever – if you ever were who you claimed to be to start with!  On those days, let us remember that if you, the eternal Son of God, could one day be in the tomb and the next alive again, that there is no barrier to great for you to come to our aid and rescue!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2013 by Galen C. Dalrymple.

To subscribe to DayBreaks, use this link: https://daybreaksdevotions.wordpress.com and click on the Subscribe button at the right of the page.  If you wish to unsubscribe, at the bottom of each email you receive about DayBreaks, you should find an “Unsubscribe” ink at the bottom of the email.

NOTE: Galen has started working with Medical Ambassadors International (MAI) (medicalambassadors.org) and is responsible for raising own support.  DayBreaks is free – and will remain so – but if you wish to help support Galen in his ministry work with MAI, you can make a donation on his behalf.  One-time donations may be made by going to this linke: http://www.medicalambassadors.org/donate.html and look down the left side of the page until you find the SUPPORT MISSIONARIES section.  Then look for “Galen Dalrymple”.  Click his name and you’ll be taken to PayPal where you can donate to his support.  If you wish to make a recurring donation, contact suzette@med-amb.org or call her at 209-543-7500 ext. 219.  You can also write a check to Medical Ambassadors International (a 501.c.3 non-profit – meaning your donations are deductible) and put S090 in the Memo field.  Mail the check to Medical Ambassadors International, P.O. Box 1302, Salida, CA 95368. 

Medical Ambassadors International is a 501.c.3 organization that has been serving the needy, sharing the gospel and helping them become self-sufficient for 32 years.  Check them out!  They are also members of ECFA (the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability).

Your support is greatly appreciated!!!!  Thank you!

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DayBreaks for 03/29/13 – The Miracle of Saturday                     

Mark 15:46 (ESV) – And Joseph bought a linen shroud, and taking him down, wrapped him in the linen shroud and laid him in a tomb that had been cut out of the rock. And he rolled a stone against the entrance of the tomb.

There are apocryphal writings that purport to describe the “lost years of Jesus.”  They tell of ridiculous, fanciful events that tickle the fancy of critics and fans of Christ alike.  Some seem almost plausible, but others are, well, ridiculous.  There’s a good reason they weren’t included in the canon!

We don’t know much about the first 30 years of Jesus life.  They are a mystery.  We can imagine him working in the carpentry shop, most likely providing for his mother and younger siblings.  Someday we can ask Him about those years, but not now.  They are lost to us for now.

One of the strangest days in Jesus’ life had to be the day between Friday and Sunday – the Saturday of Holy Week.  Again today I turn to John Ortberg’s book, Who Is This Man?:

“From a human standpoint, we think of the miraculous day as Sunday, the day the man Jesus is risen from the dead.  I wonder if, from Heaven’s standpoint, the great miracle isn’t on Saturday.  When Jesus is born, the skies are filled with the heavenly hosts praising God because that baby is Emmanuel, God with us.  Somehow Go din a manger, somehow God in a stable, somehow God on earth.  Now on Saturday, the angels look down and see what?  God in a tomb.  The miracle of Sunday is that a dead man lives.  The  miracle of Saturday is that the eternal Son of God lies dead. 

“So Jesus Christ defeats our great enemy death not by proclaiming his invincibility over it but by submitting himself to it.  If you can find this Jesus in a grave, if you can find him in death, if you can find him in hell, where can you not find him?  Where will he not turn up?”

Excellent question…

PRAYER: Lord, there are days when we act like we think you’re still in the tomb and that you are gone forever – if you ever were who you claimed to be to start with!  On those days, let us remember that if you, the eternal Son of God, could one day be in the tomb and the next alive again, that there is no barrier to great for you to come to our aid and rescue!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2013 by Galen C. Dalrymple.

 

To subscribe to DayBreaks, use this link: https://daybreaksdevotions.wordpress.com and click on the Subscribe button at the right of the page.  If you wish to unsubscribe, at the bottom of each email you receive about DayBreaks, you should find an “Unsubscribe” ink at the bottom of the email.

 

NOTE: Galen has started working with Medical Ambassadors International (MAI) (medicalambassadors.org) and is responsible for raising own support.  DayBreaks is free – and will remain so – but if you wish to help support Galen in his ministry work with MAI, you can make a donation on his behalf.  One-time donations may be made by going to this linke: http://www.medicalambassadors.org/donate.htmland look down the left side of the page until you find the SUPPORT MISSIONARIES section.  Then look for “Galen Dalrymple”.  Click his name and you’ll be taken to PayPal where you can donate to his support.  If you wish to make a recurring donation, contact suzette@med-amb.org or call her at 209-543-7500 ext. 219.  You can also write a check to Medical Ambassadors International (a 501.c.3 non-profit – meaning your donations are deductible) and put S090 in the Memo field.  Mail the check to Medical Ambassadors International, P.O. Box 1302, Salida, CA 95368. 

 

Medical Ambassadors International is a 501.c.3 organization that has been serving the needy, sharing the gospel and helping them become self-sufficient for 32 years.  Check them out!  They are also members of ECFA (the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability).

 

Your support is greatly appreciated!!!!  Thank you!

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DayBreaks for 04/22/11 – The Grave of Christ

DayBreaks for 04/22/11 – The Grave of Christ

The Empty Tomb

Now after the Sabbath, toward the dawn of the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to see the tomb. 2 And behold, there was a great earthquake, for an angel of the Lord descended from heaven and came and rolled back the stone and sat on it. 3 His appearance was like lightning, and his clothing white as snow. 4 And for fear of him the guards trembled and became like dead men. 5 But the angel said to the women, “Do not be afraid, for I know that you seek Jesus who was crucified. 6 He is not here, for he has risen, as he said. Come, see the place where he lay. 7 Then go quickly and tell his disciples that he has risen from the dead, and behold, he is going before you to Galilee; there you will see him. See, I have told you.” 8 So they departed quickly from the tomb with fear and great joy, and ran to tell his disciples. – Matthew 28:1-8

From Calvin Miller’s Once Upon a Tree:

The grave of Christ – resplendent blight –

Where Easter came to spend the night

Has left us squinting at the sight

To shade our eyes against such light

And cry he is alive and so are we!

Hallelujah!

PRAYER: Hallelujah, Lord Jesus!  To You be glory and honor and praise forever more!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

COPYRIGHT 2011, Galen C. Dalrymple  ><}}}”>

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