DayBreaks for 10/25/19 – Prayerful Considerations

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DayBreaks for 10/25/19: Prayerful Considerations

From the DayBreaks archive, October 2009:

I have to admit that I don’t spend a lot of time thinking about prayer and trying to learn how to pray more effectively.  That is a deficiency in my spiritual walk that I need to work on.  Let me share a couple of things about prayer that recently caught my attention and which I (and perhaps you) need to think about.

FIRST: assume the right posture.  I don’t necessarily mean that you have to bow your head, bend your knees, clasp your hands together in a prayerful posture, but more that we need to be humble before our God.  If we don’t humble ourselves, He will see to it that we are humbled!  We must remember that when we come to Him in prayer that we come making requests…not demands.  We are in no position to make demands upon God.  We are clearly invited to bring our cares to him, and we certainly need to bring our thanks to him as well. 

SECOND: the attitude with which we pray is important.  We are to let him know what it is that we want – we must ask as His children would ask a Father – and yet always be willing to accept what He deems to be wise and good for us.  Again, Max Lucado put it this way (paraphrasing): “Ask for what you want, pray for what is right.”  I know that what I want isn’t always (maybe not even often) what is right.  I just am not smart enough to know what is right in all the situations I face in life.  God doesn’t suffer from my limitations.  He always knows what is right and He will only do what is good for His children.

When I keep these two points in mind in my prayer life, I find that my relationship with Him is much smoother and I am much more at peace.  In both cases, I am acknowledging that I am not divine but that I have a Divine Friend who can be totally and utterly trusted!

PRAYER: Lord, it’s hard to submit our wants to what is right.  We deceive ourselves into thinking we’re wise enough to know what is right and good for us, but we are so blind that we often are wrong!  Help us to bow before You and Your omniscience at all times!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 10/10/19 – Praying When it Hurts

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DayBreaks for 10/10/19: Praying When it Hurts

From the DayBreaks archive, September 2009:

How do you pray when you are hurting?  Maybe a better question would be, “How can you pray when you are hurting so badly that you can’t even think straight?”  Have you ever experienced so much hurt (regardless of the reason) that you just couldn’t find words to say?  I have.  And sometimes I didn’t make the effort to pray because it was just too hard.  Those were the moments when I had to trust the Spirit to make intercession.

The bible makes great claims for the power of prayer (Jn. 14:12-14 – I tell you the truth, anyone who has faith in me will do what I have been doing. He will do even greater things than these, because I am going to the Father. And I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Son may bring glory to the Father. You may ask me for anything in my name, and I will do it.

Do you believe it?  Really?  Was Jesus just being hyperbolic?  It is an incredible promise from Jesus’ own lips!  When you think about it – he had reason to be so positive and sure – wherever he went in life and saw people in pain, he did something about it.  Should we think that because he is no longer here on earth that he is now powerless to do anything about it?  No!  We know that prayer connects us with the One who can heal.  But it is the times when the “healing” doesn’t come that trouble us.  As Brother Lawrence wrote: “Even when miracles seem in very short supply, when emotional problems remain unresolved or a tumor does not shrink, prayer is never wasted…many times when the specific healings I’ve prayed for have not materialized, but the situation changed in other ways.  These, too, are answers to prayer.” 

Then, he made a good observation: “We have not matured as men and women of prayer because we have not put a fraction of the time, thought and effort into learning to pray which we readily invest in our work, our hobbies, our human relationships…  If we are retarded in prayer, then we ourselves suffer for it – but so does the world.  The world needs us to be prayer therapists.  Prayer is God’s appointed way by which we become channels of His healing power.”

 “Prayer is a key which unlocks the blessings of the day and locks up the dangers of the night.”  (Anon.)  If your day could use more blessing, if your night could use more peace, prayer is the key!

PRAYER: Forgive our lack of time in speaking and listening to You in prayer.  May our desire to be with you in prayer grow and increase constantly so we may come to know you and love you more each moment!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 2/27/19 – The Great Value of Faith

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DayBreaks for 2/27/19: The Great Value of Faith

From the DayBreaks archive February 2009:

Yes, you know the verse about “Without faith it is impossible to please Him.”  So, faith is non-negotiable, if we are to please God.  But God, why?  Why does faith sometimes have to be so hard? 

In Daniel 10 is one of the most fascinating stories in Scripture.  Daniel was in prayer – and had been for some time – when Daniel becomes perplexed by why his prayer, offered in faith to the Living God, wasn’t answered already.  Since Daniel was a faithful servant of the Most High, the Lord sent an angel to Daniel to grant him a peek behind the curtain of the spiritual world.  For three weeks, in the unseen world that we can only “see” by faith, the angels says he tried to come and deliver the answer to Daniel’s prayer, but he was resisted by the “prince of the Persian kingdom.”  The angel by himself, so it reads, was not able to overcome that resistance, and had to wait for reinforcements from a heavenly power named Michael, the great archangel of God’s army. 

This passage has caused me endless trouble and distress.  Why, for example, did God wait 3 weeks to dispatch Michael to defeat the source of resistance?  Surely, God knew this was going on and would happen.  Why didn’t God just send Michael to start with?  And what does it mean that the first angel couldn’t overcome the resistance by himself?  Could the angel not have asked Got to remove it, or to give him/her the strength to defeat the resistance?  Such questions are not necessarily confidence builders for me.

Elsewhere, the Bible talks about prayer and uses the term “wrestle” to describe that activity.  It brings to mind, of course, the story of Jacob wrestling with the angel.  Perhaps prayer is much more like real, physical wrestling than we’ll ever know.  In our prayers, we are at war with principalities and powers that are in the unseen world.  Wrestling is hard work.  How much wrestling am I doing in my prayer life? 

Another thought: do angels have to learn faith and trust, too?  What was the lesson for the angel in all this, if any?  Is it possible that even angels are on a faith-journey, side by side with us, just unseen?

I don’t know, nor do I have to know.  But as Phillip Yancey put it, “I doubt Daniel ever prayed casually again.”  Nor should we!

Prayer: Father, may we be willing to engage the enemy in prayer, to call down Your power to bring victory, to release oppression and to pour forth holiness on this earth!  Give us the strength to fight for the souls of the lost, knowing that there are unseen enemies waging war with us.  Give us the wisdom to not fight in our own strength, but only in Yours!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.  

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 7/31/17 – A Lack of Presence

DayBreaks for 7/31/17: A Lack of Presence

From the DayBreaks archive, July 2007:

Prayer is such a strange thing.  It is talking.  It is listening.  It is listening to a voice that isn’t heard out loud by others.  It is richly rewarding but often terribly troubling.  Prayer is so vital that we cannot do without it, not really.

From time to time I have people ask me questions about prayer and praying.  Some wonder if it really makes a difference.  Some wonder if God will hear them.  Some wonder if I believe that God does miraculous healings in response to prayer, as if my belief in it makes the difference.  Some ask me to pray for them.  I’d much rather pray with them. 

In his book, Prayer – Does It Make a Difference?, Philip Yancey talks about those times when we don’t even want to call upon the Lord in prayer for whatever our reason may be  As always, I appreciate his refreshing honesty about his own emotions and thoughts: Sometimes I come to God out of sheer determination of will, which may seem inauthentic.  When I do so, however, I need not put on a mask.  God already knows the state of my soul.  I am not telling God anything new, but I am bearing witness to my love for God by praying even when I don’t feel like it.   I express my underlying faith simply by showing up.

When I am tempted to complain about God’s lack of presence, I remind myself that God has much more reason to complain about my lack of presence.

I wonder how many times God has thought: “I wonder why Galen won’t come and talk with Me about this.  I just wish he would!” 

For all the complaining we do about how God just doesn’t seem to be present, there have probably been 10 million times more that I have failed to show up in His throne room with my cares, concerns, fears and praises. 

Bottom line: I think our problems with prayer are not due to God’s failure to show up, but with ours!

PRAYER:  I thank you, Lord, for inviting us to bring all our cares and concerns to You.  Help our faith to grow so that we realize You are always there, eager and waiting for us to show up, and that You long to do far more than we can imagine or possibly believe.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2017 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 2/2/17: Should I Pray to be Delivered from this Hour?

DayBreaks for 2/02/17: Should I Pray to be Delivered from this Hour?

John 12:27-28 (NLT) – Now my soul is deeply troubled. Should I pray, ‘Father, save me from this hour’? But this is the very reason I came! Father, bring glory to your name…”

Wow. Just WOW! To place this verse in context, Jesus is in Jerusalem for the Passover. He has just foretold his coming death. He has also just said that his disciples must be where he is. Where would he be? He would soon be in the garden, on trial, on the cross and in the tomb. This is a sobering reminder that if our Master didn’t escape a troubled heart or a troubled life, we should not expect to, either. As David Platt said recently, we tend to think as believers we are guaranteed a safe life. We are not. In fact, if anything, we are guaranteed a troubled life if we are to inhabit all the spaces Jesus did not only physically, but also if we journey with him spiritually and emotionally – and he want to some very foreboding places in his heart.

It is interesting that Jesus shares his thoughts out loud here. Should he pray to be saved from this hour?, he asks. In matter of fact, he did make that very request some mere days or hours later in the garden. Yet, in spite of his deeply troubled heart, even here he resolves himself with the knowledge that God had a purpose for his coming, for this very hour. He came not to be delivered, but to deliver, not to be spared, but to spare others.

How do I view my own life in that regard? Do I have even an inkling of the call God has put upon my life? How often do I pray to be delivered from “this hour” when in fact, it may be that my struggle, even my death, may be the thing that will bring the most glory to the Father. My first inclination is to pray for my own preservation rather than to see my “hour” as an opportunity for his glory.

Jesus refused to pray for deliverance. Maybe I should pray less for deliverance and be more concerned about how God can use my situation and my obedience in that dark hour for His glory.

PRAYER: Lord, I am very self-centered and as I read this verse, it becomes clearer to me. Thank you for the power of your word to show us not just your love and goodness, but our weaknesses and failures, too. Use those hard times and difficult hours in our lives to bring you glory. May we be more like our Master and seek your glory and your purposes above all else! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2017 by Galen Dalrymple.

DayBreaks for 12/7/16 – Bad Reception

DayBreaks for 12/07/16: Bad Reception

I’m sure that you’ve had some version of this discussion if you have, or ever have had, a cell phone:

“I have full signal, it must be you.”

“No, it must be you, I haven’t moved and I have 5 bars.”

How often have you received a call back from the person you thought you were talking to and with great frustration you ask, “At what point did I lose you?”

Or maybe it goes more like this:

“Do you have reception? How many bars to you have?”, or:

“Can you hear me now?”

What do all these things have in common? They’re people talking about the quality of reception (or lack thereof) that they have on their cell phones. Why? Because bad reception causes interruption to communication. Sometimes we even get so frustrated with dropped calls that we stop trying any more.

Those things are all understandable when we talk about cell phones, but what about our spiritual reception? What causes a “bad signal” or blocks the exchange of information in our communication efforts with God? You may not want to take the blame, but chances are, it’s YOU! You can be sure that God always wants to hear from you, so He’s not going to be the one who creates the static on the line.

There’s another factor that enters into this equation, though, and it is this: for there to truly be communication, not only must there be someone who is communicating something, but there must also be someone who is listening. And that, I’m convinced, is where a great deal of our problem with prayer comes into play. We’re too busy talking, or thinking about other things, to hear the “still, small voice” of God.

Perhaps you are frustrated with your prayer life…feeling that you just “aren’t getting through”, that you’ve got a bad connection. Please, don’t let what you perceive as a “dropped call” stop you from reaching out. Keep “dialing”, but be sure that you’re also ready to listen for His voice at all the other times of your life, too…not just when you reach out to Him. It seems to me that there are as many instances in the Bible when God spoke to people when they weren’t praying as times when He responded directly to a prayer request. If we’re not listening, we won’t hear Him under any circumstances.

PRAYER: Teach us the sound of Your voice, let us recognize when You speak and listen closely to what You are saying. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2016, Galen C. Dalrymple.  All rights reserved.

DayBreaks for 2/26/16 – A Not-so-Stupid Question

DayBreaks for 2/26/16: A Not-so-Stupid Question

Mark 10.46-52 captures the story of the healing of the blind man, Bartimaeus.  Bartimaeus, as I’ll call him, (not to be confused with Bartimaeus Simpson!!!) cried out for Jesus to have pity on him.  Notice what happened when he and Jesus wound up face to face:  Jesus asked him a seemingly stupid question, “What do you want me to do for you?”

An outsider would say, “Well, Jesus, isn’t it obvious?   I mean, here’s a blind man, he can’t see!  What do you think he wants you to do for him, give him a new pair of shoes?!?!”  Ahhh – but there was more behind Jesus’ question than the obvious, I think. 

By asking the question, Jesus made Bartimaeus stop and think.  What did he really want from this “Son of David”?  He could have asked him for anything: a home, a chariot, to win the Jericho lottery that week, for a beautiful wife or loving children.  But he didn’t.  He wanted to see!  But Jesus question is still important for another reason: Bartimaeus needed to consider the implications of having sight.  It’s like Jesus was asking, “Are you really ready for the responsibilities of being able to see?  Have you thought it through?”  All of his life, Bartimaeus had been a beggar.  He’d never had to work, and while the wages of begging probably weren’t all that great, now he’d have to learn a skill, a trade.  He couldn’t beg anymore.  Being able to see is a wonderful gift, but it also carries with it the responsibility of seeing reality and reacting to it appropriately.

Several points:

  1. Jesus wants us to ask him for what we really want – and he wants us to carefully consider what we ask for and the price of getting what we want;
  2. Jesus, by coming into the world, has cleared up our vision, and because we have “seen” Him, we have seen the Father (John 14.9). Now we have no excuse for our blindness or remaining ignorant of the evils and wrongs done in this world and along with being able to see comes the responsibility to act as those who can see.

Have you cried out to the Lord to ask for something?  Jesus response to you is the same as that to Bartimaeus, “What do you want me to do for you?”.  It is a wonderful thing to follow Someone who cares enough to ask that kind of question and powerful enough to give us whatever we ask for.  But he’s not a cosmic vending machine who exists just to grant our requests.  He gives us things to use for His purposes, He has given us sight to see the truth, and He expects us to live changed lives as a result of being able to see the difference between right and wrong, truth and falsehood, light and darkness.

Just as the promise of Isaiah 35.5 came true for Bartimaeus, “Then will the eyes of the blind be opened…”, Jesus won’t refuse you, either.  Carefully consider what you ask for and also ask for the wisdom to use your sightedness correctly.

TODAY’S PRAYER:  Father, open our eyes to see your glory.  May we see your will for us clearly and may we live it faithfully.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2016, all rights reserved.