DayBreaks for 1/11/19 – The Radical Ordinary

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DayBreaks for 01/11/2019: The Radical Ordinary

From the DayBreaks Archive, January 2009:

At the end of the gospel of John is a scene that has puzzled and troubled me.  Momentous events have transpired in Jerusalem, in the life of Christ, and certainly in the lives of the disciples.  Events so huge and significant that you’d expect they would have all been changed dramatically and for all time.  But where do we find the disciples?  They’re back in a boat on a familiar lake doing what they had done all their lives up until Christ invited them to “Follow me!”  They’re fishing.  This is what these men had done for a livelihood.  And they’re back at it – even after Jesus had told them he’d make them fishers of men – they went back to being fishers of fish. 

I have always assumed that this didn’t reflect well on the disciples.  Yet when Jesus meets them on the beach and makes breakfast for them, he doesn’t criticize them.  I assumed that the disciples did this because they didn’t know what to make of things – that they still weren’t sure about this Jesus, what it was He was trying to accomplish, and what their part in it was supposed to be.  And that may be the reality of the situation. 

Eugene Peterson, in Living the Resurrection, had a different thought on this interesting scenario.  Resurrection had always had something to do with life in the next world, the next life.  But the resurrection of Jesus somewhat broke that rule and that line of thinking.  His resurrection took place here in this world, on this planet, in this lifetime…and he was alive and out there walking around somewhere.  So, resurrection had to be taken out of the sphere of the future and made into a reality in the present.  Here’s what Peterson had to say: “This is a radical thing.  It is as radical for you and me as it was for them.  This might account – at least, this is what I think – for why the seven former fishermen were back fishing that night.  They were beginning to get the sense that Jesus’ resurrection had everything to do with their ordinary lives.  They needed practice in this reorientation, and they plunged into ordinariness – the old familiar workplace or sea and the fishing boat.”

I don’t know if Peterson is right nor not, but the point he makes is valid.  Scripture talks about how we have already been made alive in Christ – we died with him, we were raised with him.  Our soul has experienced the resurrection already – even if our bodies have not.  What difference does it make in how you will live your life today as you drive to the office or factory, the school, the gym?  How are you, and how can you, practice the resurrection of Jesus and experience it TODAY? 

PRAYER: Jesus, we struggle to grasp the reality of our new life in You.  You have said we are born again to a new and living hope, that we now live in you and that whoever believes in you will never die!  Let us live life’s moments in that reality that others may see your glory and our joy!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

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DayBreaks for 03/25/13 – The Significance of the Ordinary

DayBreaks for 03/25/13 – The Significance of the Ordinary                   

ordinary-people-blue-over-b_largeHebrews 12:2 (NIV) – Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.

“It’s ordinary.” 

What does that mean to you?  Typically, it means it’s nothing to shout about, just routine with no particular redeeming value.  It is like a rock you get in your shoe.  Sure, you could hope that when you pull your shoe off and look at it that it might be a diamond that somehow got it there, only to find that it is nothing more than a regular piece of ordinary gray rock. 

Ordinary isn’t exciting.  Ordinary is common place.  Ordinary isn’t spectacular.  People try to steal a painting by Da Vinci or Picasso or Rembrandt, but no one would go to the trouble to steal an “ordinary” painting.

As we enter into what is called the “Holy Week”, let us be reminded that Jesus, on this week, brought a great sense of significance to the “ordinary.” 

Think about the movie Braveheart and chances are that you recall William Wallace’s powerful shout at the end of the movie, “Freedom!”  Or, if you think of Chariots of Fire, you might recall Eric Liddell’s statement about how he felt God’s pleasure in him when he ran fast.  An ordinary word, ordinary running…they weren’t the first or last people to say the word freedom or to run fast, but there’s something about those things that changed them from ordinary to something very special.

It was Martin Luther King, Jr., who centuries after Jesus lived and cried out before giving up His Spirit wrote that the man who hasn’t found something worth dying for wasn’t fit to live.  Jesus, however, put a remarkable twist to that statement: Jesus gave something to ordinary people that was worth dying for.  In fact, Jesus himself found something worth dying for – ordinary, sinful people were so precious to him that on this week nearly 2000 years ago, he resolutely went to Jerusalem knowing He would die there for ordinary, sinful men and women.  And, as Scripture says, he went not with dejectedness, but with joy!

As John Ortberg pointed out in Who Is This Man?, the ancient god of war, Mars, might inspire people to kill in the arena.  Jesus inspired his followers to die there…even as he first died for us.

PRAYER: I pray, Father, that this will not be an ordinary, routine week for us, but a week filled with wonder, amazement, awe, humility and repentance as we contemplate Your love and sacrifice for ordinary sinners like us!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2013 by Galen C. Dalrymple.

To subscribe to DayBreaks, use this link: https://daybreaksdevotions.wordpress.com and click on the Subscribe button at the right of the page.  If you wish to unsubscribe, at the bottom of each email you receive about DayBreaks, you should find an “Unsubscribe” ink at the bottom of the email.

NOTE: Galen has started working with Medical Ambassadors International (MAI) (medicalambassadors.org) and is responsible for raising own support.  DayBreaks is free – and will remain so – but if you wish to help support Galen in his ministry work with MAI, you can make a donation on his behalf.  One-time donations may be made by going to this linke: http://www.medicalambassadors.org/donate.html and look down the left side of the page until you find the SUPPORT MISSIONARIES section.  Then look for “Galen Dalrymple”.  Click his name and you’ll be taken to PayPal where you can donate to his support.  If you wish to make a recurring donation, contact suzette@med-amb.org or call her at 209-543-7500 ext. 219.  You can also write a check to Medical Ambassadors International (a 501.c.3 non-profit – meaning your donations are deductible) and put S090 in the Memo field.  Mail the check to Medical Ambassadors International, P.O. Box 1302, Salida, CA 95368. 

Medical Ambassadors International is a 501.c.3 organization that has been serving the needy, sharing the gospel and helping them become self-sufficient for 32 years.  Check them out!  They are also members of ECFA (the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability).

Your support is greatly appreciated!!!!  Thank you!

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DayBreaks for 03/25/13 – The Significance of the Ordinary                   

Hebrews 12:2 (NIV) – Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.

“It’s ordinary.” 

What does that mean to you?  Typically, it means it’s nothing to shout about, just routine with no particular redeeming value.  It is like a rock you get in your shoe.  Sure, you could hope that when you pull your shoe off and look at it that it might be a diamond that somehow got it there, only to find that it is nothing more than a regular piece of ordinary gray rock. 

Ordinary isn’t exciting.  Ordinary is common place.  Ordinary isn’t spectacular.  People try to steal a painting by Da Vinci or Picasso or Rembrandt, but no one would go to the trouble to steal an “ordinary” painting.

As we enter into what is called the “Holy Week”, let us be reminded that Jesus, on this week, brought a great sense of significance to the “ordinary.” 

Think about the movie Braveheart and chances are that you recall William Wallace’s powerful shout at the end of the movie, “Freedom!”  Or, if you think of Chariots of Fire, you might recall Eric Liddell’s statement about how he felt God’s pleasure in him when he ran fast.  An ordinary word, ordinary running…they weren’t the first or last people to say the word freedom or to run fast, but there’s something about those things that changed them from ordinary to something very special.

It was Martin Luther King, Jr., who centuries after Jesus lived and cried out before giving up His Spirit wrote that the man who hasn’t found something worth dying for wasn’t fit to live.  Jesus, however, put a remarkable twist to that statement: Jesus gave something to ordinary people that was worth dying for.  In fact, Jesus himself found something worth dying for – ordinary, sinful people were so precious to him that on this week nearly 2000 years ago, he resolutely went to Jerusalem knowing He would die there for ordinary, sinful men and women.  And, as Scripture says, he went not with dejectedness, but with joy!

As John Ortberg pointed out in Who Is This Man?, the ancient god of war, Mars, might inspire people to kill in the arena.  Jesus inspired his followers to die there…even as he first died for us.

PRAYER: I pray, Father, that this will not be an ordinary, routine week for us, but a week filled with wonder, amazement, awe, humility and repentance as we contemplate Your love and sacrifice for ordinary sinners like us!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2013 by Galen C. Dalrymple.

 

To subscribe to DayBreaks, use this link: https://daybreaksdevotions.wordpress.com and click on the Subscribe button at the right of the page.  If you wish to unsubscribe, at the bottom of each email you receive about DayBreaks, you should find an “Unsubscribe” ink at the bottom of the email.

 

NOTE: Galen has started working with Medical Ambassadors International (MAI) (medicalambassadors.org) and is responsible for raising own support.  DayBreaks is free – and will remain so – but if you wish to help support Galen in his ministry work with MAI, you can make a donation on his behalf.  One-time donations may be made by going to this linke: http://www.medicalambassadors.org/donate.htmland look down the left side of the page until you find the SUPPORT MISSIONARIES section.  Then look for “Galen Dalrymple”.  Click his name and you’ll be taken to PayPal where you can donate to his support.  If you wish to make a recurring donation, contact suzette@med-amb.org or call her at 209-543-7500 ext. 219.  You can also write a check to Medical Ambassadors International (a 501.c.3 non-profit – meaning your donations are deductible) and put S090 in the Memo field.  Mail the check to Medical Ambassadors International, P.O. Box 1302, Salida, CA 95368. 

 

Medical Ambassadors International is a 501.c.3 organization that has been serving the needy, sharing the gospel and helping them become self-sufficient for 32 years.  Check them out!  They are also members of ECFA (the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability).

 

Your support is greatly appreciated!!!!  Thank you!

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