DayBreaks for 11/27/19 – The Blessing of Darkness, #2

Image result for darkness

DayBreaks for 11/27/19: The Blessing of Darkness, #2

Yesterday we looked at Psalm 88 – one of only two Psalms that don’t have any ray of hope or light. I want to explore it a bit further today.

In Psalm 88, Heman is very vocal about the source of his trouble: You (meaning God).  God is not hearing Heman. He has had so much trouble that he believes he is near Sheol (the grave) and he says it is God who has put him there. Not only that, but God has caused his friend to distance themselves (vs. 8) from Heman, making him repulsive to them. It is God’s wrath that is heavy on him (vs. 7). In spite of that, He cries out day and night to God (vs. 9) but feels utterly rejected (vs. 14) and is so despairing that he calls the darkness his only friend (vs. 18).

What are we to make of this? Was God to blame for the darkness around Heman? I honestly don’t know, but Heman believed it. His cries are not unlike those of Job.

What is the lesson here for us? I think it may be this – if God is to blame for it (the Spirit inspired these words, remember!) – then it is a tool God is using for our good, not our harm. And what good could that possibly be? Maybe this: the value of the darkness is that it reveals to us if we are in this to serve God or to be served by Him.

It is in the darkness that we find out the truth about our motives. Satan’s accusation against God was that Job only served Him for what God did for him – that Job’s relationship with God was basically a selfish one.

I suspect that Heman learned a great deal from this darkness. And I suspect he figured it out the right way because he was still calling out to God in the midst of the darkness. He wanted answers – which he may or may not have received  just like Job – but the greatest lesson is what he learned about his motivation for being a worshipper of God.

PRAYER: Father, reveal to us, in our own darkness, the motives of our heart and our reason for claiming to be Your children. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 5/02/19 – The Reason to Live…and Die

Image result for life and death

DayBreaks for 5/02/19: The Reason to Live and Die

From the DayBreaks archive: April 2009

God created humans to live a life of love.  There was an article in the February 2009 issue of Fast Company magazine that confirmed this truth. The article described a very successful man that I’d never heard of, and you probably haven’t either.  His name is David Kelley, and he is the founder of what many regard as the premier design firm in the country—Ideo—and has been a respected professor at Stanford University for more than 30 years.  The man is enormously creative – a genius.  Suddenly, at 56 years of age, Kelley learned he had cancer.  In the Fast Company article, Linda Tischler wrote:

“What ensued was sheer hell. Chemo, surgery, radiation. Mouth sores. A throat so raw he could barely swallow. Nausea so severe he couldn’t concentrate enough to read or even watch TV. “I spent nine months in a room trying not to throw up,” he says. The treatment wrecked his saliva glands and his taste buds. He lost 40 pounds.

“Kelley is happily married and has one daughter. This is where the idea of being created for love comes in. As Kelley struggled through the difficult emotions that come with this kind of experience, he discovered his reason to live. Kelley says about his daughter:

“At first, you think, ‘I don’t want to miss her growing up.’ That’s motivating, but not that motivating. It’s when you manage to get out of yourself and start thinking of her that you get the resolve to continue. When you think, ‘I don’t want her not to have a father’—then you want to stay alive.

“What gave Kelley a reason to endure the suffering of his treatment was not the pleasure he would get out of experiencing life with his daughter, as wonderful as that would be. Kelley realized that what truly motivated him was the benefit he could bring to his daughter. What motivated Kelley at the deepest level was selfless sacrifice for another—love. We were made for this.”

Galen’s Thoughts: I will confess this: having had one episode of cardiac bypass surgery, I am not eager to contemplate ever having such surgery again, although it is probably in the cards for me somewhere down the road.  Many have been the times that I’d considered what I’d do if the doctors were to tell me some day “You need another bypass operation.”  Would I do it?  My thinking has run along these lines: if it were just me, probably not.  But I now am richly blessed with 6 grandchildren, and I’ve told myself “Yes, I’d do it because I want to watch them grow.”  That is a selfish motive (not necessarily a bad one, but self-centered nonetheless.)  It would be much better to say, “I don’t want then growing up without their Pop-pop.” (That’s me!)  That switches the motivation and focus away from me and my wishes, to them and their needs. 

After all, isn’t that the motivation that led Jesus to the cross?

Prayer: Lord, give us wisdom to find the way to love others properly, to find our motivation for living and life, death and dying, in loving service to them and You!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 2/17/16 – Home, Boys, Home!

View from the rock wall behind which the Union troops watched as the Confederate troops began the ill-fated Pickett’s charge across this open field. 

DayBreaks for 2/17/16: Home, boys, home!

One of the most amazing and deadly military attacks that ever took place was at the battle of Gettysburg on July 3, 1863. It was by all accounts a hot day. The two massive armies of the Confederacy and the Army of the Potomac had already been battering one another for two long, hot days. The Union army held the high ground all along Cemetery Ridge and had beaten back attacks on July 1 and 2. There were those who felt that there would be no battle on the 3rd due to the beating both armies had inflicted on each other – that the troops were simply too tired and there was nothing to be gained by further pressing the issue.

In spite of the advice of some of his most trusted generals, Robert E. Lee believed that if they could win the battle at Gettysburg then the war which had already raged for two long and deadly years would come to an end as there would be nothing between the Confederate army and Washington, DC. He believed that the Union would be forced to surrender.

Certainly, he was tired of the war and destruction, of the cries of the dying and wounded. He longed for it to be over. And perhaps that is why he decided on one more attack. The prior two days they had attacked at the northern and southern ends of the Union lines. On July 3, Lee believed that if his army massed an attack at the center of the Union line that they could break through to the final victory and they would win the war.

General Pickett was chosen to lead the assault. Between the Confederates and the Union armies was nearly an entire mile of open ground with no cover – and it was uphill to the Union position which was on the high ground. Approximately 12,500 Confederate soldiers stretched in a one-mile long line left the shelter of trees to march across that deadly space separating the armies. It wasn’t long before artillery shells of canister (like giant shotgun shells) was bursting over the heads of the Confederates as they plodded up the hill. Massive casualties resulted…and the the musket balls and bullets began to tear into the advancing soldiers when they got within range. Men fell by the hundreds…dead, dying, maimed. Yet they kept marching and actually broke through the Union line at one small point before the charge collapsed.

What enables men to make such a determined march in the face of nearly certain death or dismemberment? On that particular day, they were motivated by one special cry that was to dominate their thinking. It wasn’t the Rebel yell, it was something much simpler and dear to their hearts. They had been told that if they won that day that “Home is just over that hill, boys.” The cry that drive them forward that day across that deadly space was simple: “Home, boys, home!”

In the space of less than an hour, 6,555 Confederate troops fell, over 50% of the men who had started the charge.

The power of home is not to be underestimated as a motivating factor. That is why we are encouraged to not lose heart: So we do not lose heart. Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal. 2 Cor. 4:16-18 (ESV)

The soldiers on July 3 couldn’t see “home”, it was out of sight, but it drove them to incredible heights of courage and bravery. When we are tempted to surrender to life, to give up on the effort of living as a Christ-follower, let the cry of “Home, children, home!” remind us that our home is just over the hill – and He will see to it that we get there!

TODAY’S PRAYER: Lord, I confess that it is very easy to surrender to the difficulties of this life and forget about what it ahead of us, of the all-surpassing home that You have prepared for us! Let us never lose the longing to be with You in that place that is now out of our sight, yet destined to be our eternal residence! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2016, all rights reserved.

DayBreaks for 10/04/11 – No Extension

DayBreaks for 10/04/11 – No Extension

There will be no extension...

But there were also false prophets in Israel, just as there will be false teachers among you. They will cleverly teach destructive heresies and even deny the Master who bought them. In this way, they will bring sudden destruction on themselves. 2 Many will follow their evil teaching and shameful immorality. And because of these teachers, the way of truth will be slandered. 3 In their greed they will make up clever lies to get hold of your money. But God condemned them long ago, and their destruction will not be delayed. 2 Peter 2:1-3

It seems that we have a hierarchy of evil, thinking that one thing is worse than another.  And it may be in terms of its consequences.  But sin is sin and any sin is deadly to the person who commits it.  Punishment for crimes are meant to be a deterrent, whether one is talking about paying a fine, spending time in jail, or for the worst cases, execution.  Solomon, in Ecclesiastes 8:11, declares that when punishment for wrong-doing isn’t carried out speedily, it ceases to be a deterrent.  So it is with us when we sin – because we aren’t smitten with a lightning bolt every time we sin, we tend to think that either we won’t be disciplined for our sin, or that we may have gotten away with it entirely.

It’s like a tough, old cowhand who sauntered into a saloon and began drinking whiskey by the bottle. The more he drank, the more unruly he became, shooting holes in the ceiling and floor. Everybody was afraid to take on the old cowhand. Finally, the town’s little, mild-mannered storekeeper walked up to the unruly cowhand and said, “I’ll give you five minutes to get out of town.” The old cowhand holstered his gun, pushed the whiskey bottle away, briskly walked out, got on his horse, and rode out of town. When he left, someone asked the storekeeper what he would have done if the unruly cowhand had refused to go. “I’d have extended the deadline,” he said.

Many Christians have that concept of God if we miss a deadline, God will simply extend it. They do not take the judgment of God seriously.  God’s judgment will happen.  Let’s not mistake His patience and longsuffering for apathy about our sin.

PRAYER: Let us never forget Your coming day of judgment, Lord, for that may lead us to foolish conclusions and unholy living!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2011 by Galen C. Dalrymple.

To subscribe to DayBreaks, use this link: https://daybreaksdevotions.wordpress.com and click on the Subscribe button at the right of the page.  If you wish to unsubscribe, you also click on the Subscribe button at and select the Unsubscribe drop-down.

Attitudes and Motivations

It isn’t easy having a good attitude at work some days.  Mondays always seemed tough – after a couple of days off, it is hard getting out of bed early to go to a job that you may not like very much.  And of course, if it has been a three-day weekend, it seems twice as tough.  After being on vacation for an entire week or two or three?  You just as well hand me a pair of pliers and have me start yanking my teeth out one by one, or to pull out my tongue with said pliers.  I know what it is like in the secular world – I worked there for a long time!  It can also be that way in spades in a ministry position, too.

Where art thou, o motivation?!?!?!

How we view what we do is vitally important.  It gets to our attitudes and motivations – the reasons we do the things we do.  We often separate our faith life from our secular life and that’s a mistake.  As Christians, all of our life is to be centered around Jesus – and whatever we do is to be done for Him and His glory – not ours.  The following holds true whether you are talking about secular work or ministry work:

Someone has said there is a huge difference between having a job at church and having a ministry at church.

If you are doing it because no one else will, it’s a job. If you are doing it to serve the Lord, it’s a ministry.

If you’re doing it just well enough to get by, it’s a job. If you’re doing it to the best of your ability, it’s a ministry.

If you’ll do it only so long as it doesn’t interfere with other activities, it’s a job. If you’re committed to staying with it even when it means letting go of other things, it’s a ministry.

It’s hard to get excited about a job. It’s almost impossible not to get excited about a ministry.

An average church is filled with people doing jobs. A great church is filled with people involved in ministry.

How do you view what you do in your church?  How do you view your daily work?  Whatever we do, in word or deed, we are to do it in such a way that we are presenting it to God as a gift!

Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might, for in the grave, where you are going, there is neither working nor planning nor knowledge nor wisdom. – Ecclesiastes 9:10

PRAYER: Lord, it’s the middle of the week right now and we’re getting tired and worn down yet again.  Help us to have positive attitudes and godly motivations for what we do that people will be amazed at our effort and you can receive the glory!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2011 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>