DayBreaks for 2/4/19 – Two Generations Closer

Image result for grandfather and grandson

DayBreaks for 2/04/2019: Two Generations Closer

From the DayBreaks archive, 2009:

Bowing before the “god of open-mindedness,” this generation has been slow to admit that what we believe determines how we act. PBS film critic and columnist Michael Medved recently shared this anecdote out of his Jewish heritage:

“A few years ago, the illustrious Rabbi Jacob Kamenetzky made a trip to Israel accompanied by his teenage grandson. Ironically, these two deeply religious people had been seated in the airplane next to a prominent Israeli socialist leader and outspoken atheist, who had spent his whole life fighting against Orthodox values.

“After the plane reached its cruising altitude, the cynical atheist traveler couldn’t help noticing the way the teenage boy attended to the needs of his aged, bearded grandfather. He got up to get the old man a glass of water, helped him remove his shoes and put on some slippers, and otherwise demonstrated that the rabbi’s comfort represented his primary concern.

“At one point, as the boy got up for yet another errand on behalf of the old man, the skeptical stranger could contain himself no longer. ‘Tell me something,’ he asked the rabbi. ‘Why does your grandson treat you like some kind of a king? I have a grandson, too, but he wouldn’t give me the time of day.’

“‘It’s very simple,’ the old man replied. ‘My grandson and I both believe in a God who rules the universe and created all things, including the first man. That means that in the boy’s eyes, I’m two generations closer to the hand of God Himself. But in the eyes of your grandson, you’re just two generations closer to a monkey.’ “

Medved told this story as if it were true. I can’t vouch for that. But it certainly reflects truth. A person’s theology (what they think about God) determines what they think, and therefore what they do, about everything else. It should not surprise us that the behavior of people who don’t believe in God is so often ungodly. Could it be that to make our streets safe again, we need to be building more churches instead of more jails? – Richard A. Steele and Evelyn Stoner, comp., Bible Illustrations – Heartwarming Bible Illustrations, (Chattanooga, TN: AMG Publishers, 1998), p 76-77.

Galen’s Thoughts: Some Christians think that it’s okay to believe in evolution, that there’s no harm in it.  I would agree with micro-evolution – we do change over time, but not from one species to another.  We’ve gotten taller in the past 100 years, we live longer than we did 100 years ago.  And those and other changes are even more pronounced the farther back in history that you go.  But amoeba to multi-celled organism to fish to reptile to monkey to man?  No, not now, not in 10 trillion years!  God said, “Let them bring forth after their own kind” – and that somewhat puts a limit on what any creature can do reproductively. 

The way the orthodox Jewish son treated his grandfather was related to his beliefs about life, God, creation – and the value of people.  If there is no God, or if we are not made in God’s image, there is no reason to spare a human life any more frequently than to spare the life of an ant.  In fact, both would be of equal value – nothing – if we’re just products of time and chance. 

I also like the grandfather’s perspective: “I’m two generations closer to the hand of God Himself…”  I’m two generations closer to the direct creative effort of God when He made man than my grandchildren are.  But by the grace of Jesus, we can be equally as close to going to His home!

Prayer: Lord, guard our hearts against human foolishness and let us treasure all that is the work of Your hands, but especially those made in Your image!    In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 1/22/19 – The Lesson of the Maggies

Magdalene laundries

DayBreaks for 01/22/2019: The Lesson of the Maggies

From the DayBreaks archive, January 2009:

“A film made in 2002, The Magdalene Sisters, told the sad story of the “maggies” of Ireland. They got that nickname from Mary Magdalene, a revealing story in itself. The gospels mention only one fact of Mary Magdalene’s past, that Jesus had driven seven demons from her. Nevertheless, a tradition grew that Mary Magdalene must have been the same woman as the prostitute who washed Jesus’ feet with her hair. Hence when a strict order of nuns agreed to take in young women who had become pregnant out of wedlock, they labeled the fallen girls “maggies.”

“The maggies came to public attention in the 1990s when the order sold its convent, bringing to light the existence of the graves of 133 maggies who had spent their lives working as virtual slaves in the convent laundry. The media soon scouted out a dozen such “Magdalen laundries” across Ireland—the last one closed in 1996—and soon relatives and survivors were spilling accounts of the slave-labor conditions inside. Thousands of young women spent time in the laundries, some put away just for being “temptresses,” forced to work unpaid and in silence as a form of atonement for their sins. The nuns took away illegitimate children born to these women to be raised in other religious institutions.

“A public outcry erupted, and eventually campaigners raised money for a memorial, a bench in St. Stephen’s Green, a park in downtown Dublin. I determined to visit the memorial on a trip to Ireland. It was a typical gray day in Dublin, with a sharp September wind and the threat of rain in the air. I asked a policeman and a park guide about the memorial to the maggies, and they both looked at me quizzically. “Dunno that one. Sorry.”

“One by one, my wife and I examined the bronze statues and impressive fountains, mostly honoring fighters for Irish independence. Only by accident did we stumble across a modest bench beside a magnolia tree. A couple was sitting on it, but behind their backs we could see brass-colored lettering. We asked if they would mind moving aside for a moment so we could read the inscription. The plaque reads, “To the women who worked in the Magdalen laundry institutions and to the children born to some members of those communities—reflect here upon their lives.”

“Walking away from the humble memorial, I found myself reflecting not simply on their lives but also on the sharp contrast between how Jesus treated moral failures and how we his followers often do. Jesus appointed the Samaritan woman as his first missionary. He defended the woman who anointed him with expensive perfume: “Wherever the gospel is preached throughout the world, what she has done will also be told, in memory of her.” And Mary Magdalene, she of the seven demons, he honored as the very first witness of the Resurrection—a testimony at first discounted by his more prestigious followers. Where we shame, he elevates.”  – Philip Yancey, Christianity Today, 5/1/2003

Prayer:  May we learn from Your grace and be imitators of Your mercy!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 12/13/18 – The Great Anonymous

Image result for invisible man

DayBreaks for 12/13/18: The Great Anonymous

From the DayBreaks Archive, 12/9/98:

Sometimes it is hard to be anonymous, isn’t it? I mean, you work hard at your job and do something with great excellence – and someone up the line of responsibility from you gets the credit for it. Kind of gets your goat, doesn’t it? I mean, it isn’t like you are even asking to be given all the credit – just to be recognized. Or, if you are a housewife, haven’t you ever done something really well and it went unnoticed and unappreciated? It is no fun! If you’ve ever found yourself feeling left out, unacknowledged or unimportant, 1 Cor. 12 verses 22 and 24 were put in the Bible just for you: On the contrary, those parts of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable…while our presentable parts need no special treatment, but God has combined the members of the body and has given greater honor to the parts that lacked it….

Paul realized that even in his day, sometimes people feel unappreciated in the church. You may be feeling that way right now. You’ve labored behind the scenes for years cleaning the building, running the sound equipment, preparing the communion, changing diapers in the nursery, or printing the bulletin each week. Not everyone is or can be an “up-front” and public figure. But the church can’t function without EVERY piece of the body doing its job.

Sometimes we get things confused. Just because you may not be the person filling the pulpit doesn’t mean that you aren’t important. If there is anything that the passage from 1 Corinthians should teach us it is this: Don’t ever mistake being anonymous with being unnecessary or unimportant. Rather Paul calls the weaker parts of the body indispensable, and God gives greater honor to the parts of the body that lack honor. After all, if you are going to be honored, wouldn’t you rather it was God that honors you instead of your fellow men?

God remembers you and will reward you, Psalm 136:28: …to the One who remembered us in our low estate – His love endures forever. Recognition will come in due time to everyone who, rather than picking and choosing ministry opportunities based on talents, interest or recognition, obeys the command to “Always give yourselves fully to the work of the Lord.”

Prayer: Lord, may we seek Your approval…and Your approval ONLY!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2018 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 2/27/18 – Visiting With Isaiah, #1

DayBreaks for 2/27/17: Visiting With Isaiah, #1

Isaiah 6:1 (ESV) – In the year that King Uzziah died I saw the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up; and the train of his robe filled the temple.

On Sunday, we had a guest speaker as it was our church’s global outreach Sunday. His name was Doug Fell and he was from South Africa. His message was awesome as he opened the passage from Isaiah 6:1-8 to our understanding. It was also very convicting. So, for this week, I think I’ll share with you from this amazing passage that relays the incredible story of Isaiah’s vision.

King Uzziah started out to be a good king. Sadly, he didn’t finish his reign as a good king. To some degree, King Uzziah is incidental to this story, though it sets the timeframe for Isaiah’s vision for us. He became king, as co-regent with his father, when he was just 16 years of age and he ruled for 52 years. Toward the end of his life he was struck by leprosy and he died around 740-739 BC.

Even in Israel, kings died – whether they had been good or bad kings made no difference. Every earthly ruler whether they were kings, premiers, presidents, emperors or we called by some other honorific at one time or another found themselves in the grave.

But the one that Isaiah sees in his vision is different in many, many ways – about as different as darkness is from light. When Isaiah sees the king in his vision, he doesn’t even call him by the name king, but by the term, the Lord.

The Lord is in a position of kingship: he is seated on a throne, but not just any throne, one that is high and lifted up. The image is that of a King that isn’t ordinary in any sense of the word, but of an extremely exalted King. It isn’t Uzziah who sits on this throne, for he has just died. There is only one throne in the vision and only one who is worthy and glorious enough to be seated upon it. 

Note the description of the King: not only is he seated on a lofty throne, the train of his robe filled the temple. Pause for a moment and reflect on a coronation ceremony that you may have seen on television, or in photographs. As the royal personage makes their way through the cathedral or inauguration location, they are dressed in their finest royal accoutrements. They have huge “trains” that follow them as a symbol of their importance and honor. The train may drag on the ground or be lifted by lesser humans as a sign of respect, glory and the  magnificence of the person being crowned – as if the one being inaugurated is too lofty to be soiled by the dirt on the floor. But, when all is considered, the train is fairly small compared to the building.

Not so with the king in Isaiah’s vision: his train fills the entire temple. What does that mean? It means that this king’s glory and honor and magnificence is without limit. It is overwhelming. It means that there is no room for glorifying anyone or anything else. THIS King is unlike any other king who has ever been royalty. He is different in honor and glory by magnitudes of scale.

How would you react to this King if it had been you instead of Isaiah who saw it? Stay tuned for Isaiah’s reaction in the next few days, but for now, simply dwell on the most magnificent scene of honor you have ever seen and multiply it by infinity and perhaps you’ll get a sense for the King of Isaiah’s vision. The vision changed Isaiah – the question is will it change us?

PRAYER: God of heaven and earth – how often we neglect to ponder your magnificence and the honor that is due to your name! How seldom we get a glimpse of your glory because we are too busy frantically running to and fro with our own affairs. Bring us up short and help us get even the slightest vision of you in all your magnificence, and may it change us forever! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2017 by Galen Dalrymple.

DayBreaks for 5/30/16 – Remember Their Sacrifices

DayBreaks for 5/30/16 – Remember Their Sacrifices

Romans 13:7 (NIV) – Give everyone what you owe him: If you owe taxes, pay taxes; if revenue, then revenue; if respect, then respect; if honor, then honor.

It is Memorial Day, 2016, here in the United States. To many, it is the “unofficial” start of summer. Many go camping or start vacations if their kids are out of school. The weather is warm and families get together. But let’s get first things first, can we?

Some seem to confuse this day with Veteran’s Day….both are very special and commemorate people to whom we owe our thanks. But Memorial day is set aside to remember those who gave their lives as a sacrifice for those they loved and cared for. We cannot possibly thank them, or their families, too much. We should be forever grateful for the men and women who laid down their lives or our freedom. Their sacrifice will, and should, be remembered and their memories honored.

As we worshipped on Sunday, I couldn’t help but think of Jesus. He, too, laid down his life for us in the ultimate battle: the struggle between good and evil. And even as he rose, one day he will bring life to not only believers but all those who have died throughout all of history.

It is right for us to remember those who didn’t love their own lives to dearly to sacrifice it for those they loved more than life. That describes the fallen soldiers of our country, but also our Lord. 

Let us honor them all today as they deserve…but let us honor our Lord above all.

PRAYER: Jesus, we today remember the families of those who died for our freedom. We pray you bring the comfort and warm memories to the loved and lost. May we honor you for your sacrifice above all!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2016, Galen C. Dalrymple. All rights reserved.

 

DayBreaks for 5/25/15 – They Watched Them Die

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DayBreaks for 5/25/15: They Watched Them Die

“Many have been there.  Your grandfather, parents, perhaps aunts, uncles, cousins, sons and daughters – they were there.  They saw friends killed by the enemy.  It changed them. To see people die is a horrific thing.

“Nothing can erase that from your mind.  No one can understand it fully unless you have been there.  I have not been there, but I have heard the stories.

“They knew that it was inevitable that some would die.  In every war, some have died.  One a day like today, we honor those who have died standing up for others.  Perhaps you know people who know people who died in wars.  Maybe you know people who died.  We grieve with you as you grieve with us.  Wars are horrific.  In every war, some have died.

“Think today about the current wars and the next ones.

“There will be more of this: more killing and more people we know who know people who will give their lives as an ultimate sacrifice.  It will not end for a long time.  We don’t know how long, and we don’t know how many more will die.  It is heartbreaking and depressing.

“What is our hope?  In every war, some have died, except in one war.  In that war, only One died.  His Father watched him die.  He died, so that those who believe would have life, the life that is eternal.  All who believe have life, even after death.

“He is our only hope for ending all wars.  How will he do it and when?  We don’t know.  In the meantime, we have to live as followers of Him and think deep thoughts about overt and hidden wars, weapons of mass destruction, nuclear arms and conflict.

“Today, on this Memorial Day weekend, we remember and honor those who have died in all the wars to protect us, and we remember the One who have His life to end all wars.

“To those of you who watched them die, I want to say we are thankful that you are still here.  Don’t let us forget your friends.” – Author Unknown

Remember well this day those who no longer walk among us.

PRAYER: Thank you, Prince of Peace, for those who also stand watch over us and protect us.  Thank you for their courage and their sacrifice, and we pray you comfort all who have loved them and lost them.  Thank you for ultimately winning the war against war and we long to see that become reality. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

© 2015, Galen C. Dalrymple.

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DayBreaks for 3/25/15 – Positions of Honor

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DayBreaks for 3/25/15: Positions of Honor

From the DayBreaks archive, dated 3/22/2005:

It is a tragic scenario: very shortly before the death of Jesus, his disciples are quarreling about who will get to sit at his right hand and at his left hand, positions of honor at a feast.  It is inconceivable that they should be arguing about such things even in the looming shadow of the cross, until we remember that they didn’t really understand that Jesus was on his way to Jerusalem to die.  To the disciples, however, to be at either side of Jesus was glory: folks would talk about how important and worthy and righteous they must be to have found such favor in Jesus’ eyes.  Jesus, however, tells them plainly that they don’t have a clue what they are asking – and he leaves it at that.

Now, days later, Jesus is on the cross.  But he’s not alone.  There is someone on his right and someone on his left – the place that the disciples believed was a place of honor.  But they were no where to be found.  They found out that to be on the right or left hand of Jesus wasn’t all it appeared to be.  In fact, those who were on the right and left hand of Jesus were criminals…vile sinners.  And they weren’t getting praise from anyone…instead they were getting nails and broken legs.

When James and John asked Jesus for the places of honor next to him in his kingdom, he told them they didn’t know what they were asking (Mark 10:35-39). Jesus was trying to tell his position-conscious disciples that a person who wants to be close to Jesus must be prepared to suffer and die. The way to the kingdom is the way of the cross.

But, there was truth to part of the disciples’ belief.  For one of the thieves, he found the position next to Jesus to be one not only of honor, but of salvation.  The other, sadly, did not.  One discovered that just being close to Jesus in proximity wasn’t enough.  We have to be united to him in death, alive in him with faith and hope, and in so doing, we will walk the streets of paradise with him in the kingdom.

Do you desire a place of honor and recognition?  Have you come to the cross yourself?  Have you taken up your place on the cross next to Jesus?  Have you died so that you might live?  To die with Jesus is a great thing – once you’ve accepted him through faith.  But dying next to him without faith is the utmost futility.  And if as faithful ones we die with Jesus, how much more glorious is it to live for and with him?

Copyright by 2005 Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

PRAYER: It is hard to understand the requests of the disciples until we put ourselves in their place, Lord, and realize that we would have likely done the same thing.  Help us not to seek our glory, but yours!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

© 2015, Galen C. Dalrymple.

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