DayBreaks for 10/19/18 – How the Games Ended

Image result for roman colosseum

DayBreaks for 10/19/18: How the Games Ended

One person armed with the Gospel of peace can change the world. Telemachus did. He was a monk who lived in the 5th century. He felt God saying to him, “Go to Rome.” He was in a cloistered monastery but he put his possessions in a sack and set out for Rome. When he arrived in the city, people were thronging in the streets. He asked why all the excitement and was told that this was the day that the gladiators would be fighting in the coliseum, the day of the games, the circus. He thought to himself, “Four centuries after Christ and they are still killing each other, for enjoyment?” He ran to the coliseum and heard the gladiators saying, “Hail to Caesar, we die for Caesar” and he thought, “this isn’t right.” He jumped over the railing and went out into the middle of the field, got between two gladiators, and tried to stop them. The crowd became enraged and stoned the peacemaker to death.

When the Emperor of Rome, Honorius, heard about the monk he declared him a Christian martyr and put an end to the games. Legend has it that the very last Gladiatorial game was the one in which Telemachus died.

Jesus said, “Have salt in yourselves – be at peace with each other.” Sometimes it seems we have gladiatorial games going on inside the church, inside our homes, at work…

PRAYER: Jesus, we often feel that we can’t really make a difference – and so we won’t even try. Help us find the courage to stand for the right when surrounded by wrong. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2018 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

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DayBreaks for 11/25/16 – The Games People Play

DayBreaks for 11/25/16: The Games People Play

The 1960’s pop singer Joe South wrote a song that had these words:

Oh the games people play now

Every night and every day now

Never meaning what they say now

Never saying what they mean

And they wile away the hours

In their ivory towers

Till they’re covered up with flowers

In the back of a black limousine

Games…we love to play games. Board games, sports games, mind games, video games, computer games, word games, mathematical…the list goes on and on. As human beings we are fascinated by our games. Games are good-for games can and do provide physical exercise and mental stimulation as well as develop coping skills, management skills-not to mention providing a respite from the pressures of everyday life. Yes, we all love games-some of us too much. It has been said of Americans that we “play at our work and work at our play.” Yes, there are times when even the best of us take our games too seriously.

There are also games we play that we should not play. These are the games that we use to avoid life, to avoid dealing with the harsh realities that life can bring us. Back in the sixties Eric Berne wrote Games People Play–an analysis of the ways in which people relate to each other and why we do so. His basic thesis is that “games are substitutes for the real living of real life.” We play games because we do not want to get down to the real human business of honest to God interaction. We would rather live at a superficial level of societal games than to talk about who we are and what we feel.

What games are you playing that may be detrimental to your family, your work, your friends, your health? What games are you playing that weaken your walk with Christ? Don’t you think it may be time to stop playing some of those games and get real?

PRAYER: Father, may we take time to play – but give us the wisdom to know when to play and when to be serious! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2016, Galen C. Dalrymple.  All rights reserved.

DayBreaks for 6/26/15 – Come Out, Come Out, Wherever You Are!

DayBreaks for 6/26/15: Come Out, Come Out, Wherever You Are

Galen is traveling and today’s DayBreaks is from the DayBreaks archive:

I remember playing hide and seek when I was a kid.  No, we didn’t have video games then, so we had to play boring old games where you had to run around and actually expend some energy!  I can’t say that I remember being very good at hide and seek.  Seems that I seldom got found.  Perhaps they just didn’t want to find ME!  But I remember I wasn’t all that great at finding others, either.  And of course, when you couldn’t find someone and you were ready to give up, you’d yell out “Come out, come out, wherever you are!”, and then all those who’d not been found would come out of their hiding places. 

I’m not sure, but I think that perhaps as we get older, we get better at hiding.  We start to hide our feelings (something that little kids can’t do very well), we hide our flaws and quirks, we work very hard at hiding our mistakes in the business world – and if caught – are quick to pass the blame along to someone else, which is really nothing more than another way of hiding. 

The very first game we ever play is usually “peek-a-boo”.  I’ve got to tell you that when I see grown ups acting like crazy folks playing peek-a-boo with their babies, I have to chuckle.  Don’t they know how silly they look?  (Hey – that’s not fair now, I used to play it with my kids – and now my grandkids – but somehow I’m sure I’ve managed to maintain a dignified look when I do it!)  It seems like a simple enough game, doesn’t it?  But it is a very important one, too, if you think about it.

What do babies learn from this simple game?  They learn things that we as adults need to remember rather than forget:

FIRST: we can try to hide ourselves, but we really can’t.  Just because we can’t see someone else (when we cover our eyes), it doesn’t mean that they’re not there.  It just means that our vision is blocked.  We can cover our eyes, but the parents know that we’re still there.  They can still see us with our eyes covered.  God sees us even when we try to blind ourselves to pretend that He’s not there and watching.  We are so foolish!

SECOND: we learn the joy of being “found” again.  The baby that removes their hands from their eyes and again sees mom or dad squeals with delight to be in contact again with the parent.  Their little faces crinkle all up with joy and excitement.  We need to remember the joy of being “found”.  We don’t want to be hidden, isolated, cut off from others.  Most of all, we shouldn’t want to be cut off from God.  But we tend to forget the joyfulness of being “found”.  Oh, that our faces should be like babes faces again and we would squeal with delight at knowing we’ve been found by God, and that we are in His tender care!

It’s been a long time since I’ve played hide-and-seek, but I think I’m about ready again.  How about you?

Copyright by 2005 Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

PRAYER: Jesus, help us to stop playing games and let us rejoice that we have been found!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

© 2015, Galen C. Dalrymple.

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