DayBreaks for 6/14/19 – The Most Frequently Spoken Word in Heaven

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DayBreaks for 6/14/19: The Most Frequently Spoken Word in Heaven

What is your conception of heaven? Do you picture it as some sort of ethereal, cloudy, up-in-the-air-somewhere existence? You probably don’t picture it as floating around on a cloud with a harp, but you might picture it as a place where all that happens is singing praises 24×7 in a world where 24×7 is meaningless because time is no more. While I deeply love worship, I certainly hope there’s more to it than that – and I think it will be much more than that!

You know what I look forward to? Meeting Jesus and loved ones and great people of faith from all the ages are part of it, and I hope that my beloved pets will be there. But what I really look forward to is learning constantly and getting answers to the things that I don’t understand while I’m limited by my finite mind and the view from this world’s portal.  

C.S. Lewis once said that the most frequently spoken word in heaven would be, “OH.” As in, “Oh, now I understand.” Or, “Oh, now I see what God’s plan was.” Or, “Oh, now I see the reason for the trial I went through.”

Can you identify with that? I sure can.

We are told that God’s plan will work out for us for the good if we love him. But that doesn’t mean we understand why babies are stillborn, why someone kills one of our children in an act of violence, why cancer stalks us or why we are rejected and cast out. I honestly don’t think we’ll know those answers until we get to heaven. I suspect I’ll be saying “Oh!” a lot. For now our challenge is to trust him that all that happens is meant for our good and not our harm.

Jeremiah 29:11 (CSBBible) – For I know the plans I have for you—this is the LORD’s declaration—plans for your well-being, not for disaster, to give you a future and a hope.

PRAYER: Give us patience and perseverance, Lord, until the answers to our confusion are made clear! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

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DayBreaks for 12/14/18 – Aiming Past Life

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DayBreaks for 12/14/18: Aiming Past Life

From the DayBreaks Archive, 12/9/98:

Okay, let’s see how many of you have tried this: have you ever put a board (even just one – and maybe a thin one at that) between two bricks and tried to break the board with your hand?  I’ve tried it – on more than one occasion.  I’ve seen it done in person (in fact, my oldest granddaughter can do it!) – but not just with one board, but with many boards, with cement blocks or blocks of solid ice.  I can only say that if you tried it, I hope you were more successful than I.  And I hope you didn’t hurt yourself, either!

It isn’t just big, hulking guys who do this kind of stuff.  I’ve seen little folk do it – men and women.  So the key to the ability to smash stuff like that with your bare hands can’t be based on brute strength. 

There are actually two things that are necessary, according to those who bust stuff with their bare hands, if one is to break boards, ice or cement blocks with nothing more than the edge of a hand.  Here they are: 1) focused concentration, and 2) aiming at a point just beyond the board.  In other words, it is important to not get distracted by things around you as you focus on hitting a point in your mind that is just beyond the visible board.  Of course, the “point” you aim at isn’t visible because the board blocks it from view, so that’s where the focus also comes into play.

Life is often somewhat like that board.  It’s hard and unyielding.  We bump up against it over and over and bruises are usually the result.  Life doesn’t bend, as a general rule.  If we are to break through the frustration of living in this world, we must be focused, and we must aim at something beyond this life – something that is just on the other side of what is visible.  And then we must drive with all our force to that “something” that is just beyond our sight. 

For Christians, we take note of what the Word says in 2 Corinthians 4:18 (NIV) – So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen. For what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.  What is seen is like the board – it’s not really the goal – the goals is unseen, just on the “other side”.  And again, Hebrews 12:2 (NIV) instructs us: Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.  We are to focus all our energy, our vision, on Jesus.  And where is he?  Seated at the right hand of the throne of God.  He’s in the realm of the unseen, and he awaits us just beyond what is visible.

Another way to think of this is that death is the board – a door, if you will – that prevents us from seeing what is not unseen.  But it will not always be so.  And what will we see when we break through?  Jesus.

PRAYER: We pray that You will sharpen our focus and help us to remember that we are not to aim at things in this life that would distract us from what is presently unseen.  Strengthen us to look beyond this life to see the Risen Son seated in glory, awaiting our arrival!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2018 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 12/12/18 – Happiness

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DayBreaks for 12/12/18: Happiness

From the DayBreaks Archive, 12/9/98:

The holidays are a tough time of year for many people. I know that there are those of you who will read these words who will be spending the first holidays without your parents, a child, a spouse or some other loved one. (Galen, 12/12/18: in fact, this is my first Christmas without my mother as she is now in glory with my dad.) As if that weren’t enough, others are unhappy because of a job that is taking the best you have to offer and no one seems to notice or appreciate your efforts. Financial burdens loom large at this time of the year. You may have guilt in your heart because you would like to give someone special something that is more than you can afford and you know you can’t give it – so you’ll settle for less and feel unhappy about it.

What is happiness? We have a sense that it is feeling cheerful, feeling good about yourself and the situation you are in. That’s what it has come to mean in our culture. But that wasn’t the original meaning or interpretation of happiness. From a Breakpoint by Charles Colson (11/9/98): “Dean Hudson, editor of Crisis magazine, writes that the classical idea of happiness had to do with a state of character and virtue. The ancient Greek word for happiness meant the formation of character over a lifetime. It referred to how well we conformed ourselves to reality: that is, the structure of the universe around us, and our own nature. Only by learning to live in accord with our true nature can we be genuinely happy.”

Our true nature is to be and act in the image of God. God doesn’t delight in things – He didn’t even delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices of the Israelites. He already owns everything. There isn’t anything we can give to Him that He needs. He is happy because He cannot be anything except true to His own nature. We, however, have been infected with a virus that has warped and twisted us and marred our own view of what our true nature is. It is only when we get back to understanding our true nature that we will find happiness.

It seems to me that the Greeks understood this pretty well: happiness is indeed the formation of character over a lifetime. And the character that is to be formed in us is the character of Christ. As He becomes more and more real and a bigger and bigger part of our lives – we’ll find more happiness than we could ever imagine!

Some people think more money would make them happy. Or to have one more child. A bigger home. The movie, “What Dreams May Come” suggests that heaven is going to be whatever we imagine it to be or want it to be. I think that’s wrong. Heaven will be much better than that because it will be what God wants it to be. My wanting is too corrupt and not imaginative enough. God knows what will make me happy – and He knows how to provide it in abundance!

PRAYER: May we learn that happiness is not something that can be purchased in a store, and that Your plan and will for us is far better than what we would choose for ourselves!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2018 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 11/28/18 – God’s Bizarre Carpentry Shop

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DayBreaks for 11/28/18: God’s Bizarre Carpentry Shop

From the DayBreaks archive, November 2008:

Romans 8:28 (NASB) – And we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose.

My daughter can do macramé – you know, that weird bit about cutting and folding a sheet of paper so that it resembles a swan or some other animal.  I have to admit, while she’s in the process of taking the piece of paper and beginning to fold it, I can’t start to imagine what in the world she’s making.  As she folds away in a meticulous fashion, I remain confused.  It isn’t until the end of the process that I can see what she was making, but I couldn’t begin to replicate what she’s done.

In his second letter to the Corinthians, Paul had this to say (chapter 4:16-17, NIV): Therefore we do not lose heart. Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we are being renewed day by day. For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all.

Our first reaction to verse 17 is to think that Paul has totally lost his marbles.  “Light and momentary troubles”?  Are you kidding me?  Try telling that to the mother of a special needs child who requires 24-hour care, day in and day out.  Try telling it to the young man in the wilds of the hills in Afghanistan, or to his wife who struggles to raise 3 kids without his presence.  Try telling it to the person who has once more been diagnosed with cancer – after having beaten it once.  “Light and momentary,” you say?  Harumph. 

But Paul nonetheless claims it is so.  How can he say that?  Well, he says that, in God’s bizarre carpentry shop, that it is those very troubles that are achieving for us an eternal glory that outweighs those very trouble.  The word for achieving in the Greek means, “to make possible”, “to bring to pass.”  Paul says, that somehow (and this is way beyond me!), that our troubles from this earth will make possible our eternal glory.  I think it works like this: what is earthly must be torn down and removed so what is heavenly can start to be built.  It’s like tearing up a bad street to create a new paved one – until the old is torn out and removed, the new can’t be put in place.  And the troubles we have in this world are designed to encourage us to let go of this world and its attractions so that new, eternally glorious things can be put in their place. 

Oh, and one more thing.  Paul says the troubles are “light”, from the Greek, elaphros, which means “easy to bear.”  They are easy to bear only when we keep our perspective.  What is here is light (not of much weight) and temporary (of short duration).  What we await is an eternal glory that “outweighs” them (the glory is HEAVY, but not a burden) – and eternal.  Here’s Paul’s point: not all the troubles of this world are of greater weight nor longer duration than the glory of heaven.  That’s a perspective worth keeping!

Prayer: Lord, we don’t understand how You do it, but we thank you that our earthly troubles make possible our eternal glory.  The next time we are distress and in deep trouble, may we remember Paul’s perspective, and lean hard into eternal things!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2018 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 11/27/18 – Frozen Fishermen (and Home)

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DayBreaks for 11/27/18: Frozen Fishermen (and Home)

From the DayBreaks archive, November 2008:

It’s been some number of years now, but I used to take an annual 3-day fishing and camping trip with my friends, Ken, Larry and Tom.  We went different places each year, but it was always a highlight of our fall season.  We worked together at a company called Triad and had grown to be good friends over the years.  Our trips became so famous in the company that at company breakfasts after our get-away, we’d be asked about the trip or invited to show pictures! 

One year, we went to a place called Loon Lake.  We’d been there before and the fishing was usually pretty good, and at the time it was fairly isolated.  It was located at 6500 feet in the Sierra Nevada, about 50 miles off highway 50 that eventually goes into the south end of Lake Tahoe.  Having been there before, we thought we knew what we were getting in to.  We didn’t.

The weather was beautiful the first couple of days we were there and we had ice chests full of fish.  On our last night there, it was a bit cooler, and we crawled into the tent and our sleeping bags looking forward to one more morning of fishing. 

Morning dawned – cold and wet.  It had started raining during the night and we were as wet as we could be.  Temperatures had plummeted to near freezing.  As I recall, there were drips and drabs of ice mixed in with the rain.  As I had noted, we’d been to Loon Lake before and thought we knew what we were up against.  But since the weather had been nice before, none of us had brought rain gear.  But, being the manly men that we thought we were in our younger days, we still wanted to fish.  So, we cut neck and arm-holes in the trash bags we’d taken and put them on over our jackets and headed down to the lake to fish.  The only problem was that it was so cold that our fingers were too numb to bait the hooks.  So, two of the guys who were not as full of their “manliness” as the other two of us were, volunteered to keep their hands in their pockets to warm them up and then to bait the hooks while the other two of us fished.  We did that for a while – and the weather kept getting colder and windier and wetter.  It wasn’t long until we were all thinking the same thing: won’t it be great to get home and get a hot shower and warm up!

Well, we survived – no one lost any fingers or toes, and we left vast numbers of trout uncaught.  We were miserable, no doubt about it.  But how much more miserable would we have been if we didn’t have a clear picture of the homes and warmth to which we would return? 

So it is with this world.  This world is a white-out, a blizzard, trying to freeze the very life out of us.  And, for much of the time, we are to varying degrees and for varying reasons, miserable while here.  It is the heavenly vision, of the warmth of the Presence, of the warm welcome, of the place of comfort – that revitalizes us.  We don’t think of heaven enough, I fear.  Let the thought of heaven warm your heart and soul and give you the focus to keep going until you arrive at His house! 

Prayer: Lord, thank you for the vision that has the power to keep us moving forward, for the promised place of rest and reward that will make this life and it’s struggles seem like nothing.  When we start to lose hope, to freeze over, warm us with the vision of your eternal love, in Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2018 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 9/26/17 – The Reality of Now

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DayBreaks for 9/26/18The Reality of Now       

From the DayBreaks archive, September 2008:

John 17:3: Now this is eternal life: that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent.

Lk. 17:20-21: The kingdom of God does not come with your careful observation nor will people say, ‘Here it is,’ or ‘There it is,’ because the kingdom of God is within you.

If you are like most of us, we think of heaven as being “out there” somewhere in the future.  The place of heaven isn’t so much of a topic for thought as is the time when we shall arrive there.  We can easily trust that heaven will not only meet, but infinitely surpass our wildest imaginings.  And perhaps that’s why, when life caves in, we long and hunger for it to come soon.  I think such things are only normal and natural.

But God has a way of not operating in normal or “natural” ways.  And the things that the inspired writers of Scripture captured for us deserve more attention.  Jesus, in his own words, says that eternal life is “that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent.”  Isn’t that interesting?  Heaven is not a particularly a place (although there is such a place), but what makes heaven heavenly is the knowing of God and Jesus which we will experience.  And, by the way, it is available, and present, now…not just out there in the future.

The Luke passage is even more stunning: it won’t be something we see coming, this kingdom of God, but it is within us.  A kingdom is the place where a king rules, where he lives.  We might think of the kingdom of God as being heaven (and that’s not incorrect) but the fact is that God’s rule is everywhere…and His Presence is, believe it or not, within us.  That means that His kingdom is also within us…now. 

As Mark Buchanan said in Things Unseen: “There is something about heaven that we must grasp, because if we don’t, we’ll miss everything else.  We’ll read the music but never sing, study the choreography but never dance.  It’s this: heaven starts now.

“Eternity is not primarily a measure of time – chronological time stretched to infinity.  It is not first and foremost a place.  Eternity is primarily a quality of relationship.  It is first and foremost a presence; to know God and Jesus Christ.

Perhaps the one claim Christianity makes that is the most offensive to the world and presents the greatest stumbling block is that there is only one why to God…and that way is belief in Jesus (not in Mohammed, Buddha, or any other person).  All a Christian has to do is say, “Christianity, Jesus Christ, is the only way to God,” and you’ll instantly be branded as a closed-minded, bigoted person.  But when you understand that eternal life is to know Jesus (as Jesus said in John 17), it makes perfect sense.  If eternal life is to know him, if you don’t know him – there cannot be eternal life.  Heaven is intimate knowledge, not of something, but of Someone – the only true God and Jesus Christ, the one He sent.

PRAYER: Almighty Lord, we long to know you better, to experience in greater measure and purity the eternal life that only comes from knowing You.  Keep us from the pride in our hearts and minds that might tell us that we already know you, guard us so that we don’t stop seeking to learn to know you better each passing day.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

COPYRIGHT 2018 by Galen C. Dalrymple. All rights reserved.

DayBreaks for 9/21/18 – A Song for Your Funeral

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DayBreaks for 9/21/18: A Song for Your Funeral          

From the DayBreaks archive, September 2008:

Have you given much thought to your funeral or memorial service?  What would you like to be sung, read, said?  I think it’s time well spent to consider such things and let loved ones know how you’d like them to celebrate your life. 

Not surprisingly, many people have a favorite song or two that they want to have sung or played at their service.  Here’s some recent data from Ananova about what songs are popular these days at funerals:

“AC/DC’s Highway to Hell is becoming one of the most requested funeral tunes in Australia.

“Ding Dong the Witch is Dead from The Wizard of Oz, and Another One Bites the Dust by Queen are also popular, reports the Daily Telegraph.

“Funeral managers at Centennial Park, the largest cemetery and crematorium in Adelaide, said only two hymns still rank among its top 10 most popular funeral songs: Amazing Grace and Abide With Me.

“Highway to Hell, which includes the line: “Going down, party time; My friends are gonna be there too”, is just outside the top ten, with Led Zeppelin’s Stairway to Heaven.

“Leading the funeral chart is crooner Frank Sinatra’s classic hit My Way followed by Louis Armstrong’s version of Wonderful World.

“Some of the more unusual songs we hear actually work very well within the service because they represent the person’s character,” Centennial Park chief executive Bryan Elliott said.

“Among other less conventional choices were Always Look on the Bright Side of Life by Monty Python, Hit the Road Jack, and I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead.” – Ananova, Copyright 2008

What does it say about modernity that people would want “Highway to Hell” instead of Christian hymns at their services?  It seems a slap in the face, on the surface, but it shouldn’t surprise us.  In a world where there is no belief in hell (but there is belief in heaven), we’ve allowed hell to become a joke, a “cute” lyric for a song – picturing it as party time with one’s good friends.  Perhaps it’s an attempt at wiping clean the slate of consciousness that keeps nagging the sinner for what they’re doing.  After all, if you can turn something as serious as hell into a joke, there’s nothing left to be afraid of, and you can eat, drink and be merry without fear of consequences. 

Perhaps a more sobering question isn’t “What song do you want played at your funeral?” but this question: “Which song would best describe your life before you died?” 

PRAYER: We deceive ourselves so easily into thinking that You are only a God of love, and not also a God of justice.  Don’t let us fall for cute lyrics when something as important as human souls are at stake.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

COPYRIGHT 2018 by Galen C. Dalrymple. All rights reserved.