DayBreaks for 4/16/19 – Lessons My Dog Taught Me…about Snakes

DSC06520DayBreaks for 08/16/19: Lessons My Dog Taught Me – About Snakes

From the DayBreaks archive, August 2009:

(Written on August 10, 2009) – Well, what a day it has been.  Actually, what a 24 hours it has been.  Starting last night at about 9:30 p.m., Casper (our white boxer) discovered a rattlesnake about 6 feet up the hill behind our house.  At first I didn’t know what it was when I heard it – it sounded more like an electrical buzzing than the rattlesnakes you hear on TV.  Casper was jumping against a retaining wall at the edge of our patio that hold the hill in abeyance, and I eventually saw why: a rattler, about 2 feet long, that started slithering up the hillside toward some brush.  I immediately brought him back inside and blocked off the dog door so neither Casper nor Rainie (our other dog) could get outside and get bitten.  I then launched a frantic search for the ammunition for either the .22 or the shotgun. 

By the time I found the ammunition, the snake had crawled up under some brush, but I could still hear it, even though I couldn’t see it very well (it was dark, my eyes aren’t the best anymore, and the brush concealed most of it except for its tail.)  Since it was late, I used the .22 and not the shotgun.  I didn’t want to alarm the neighbors.  I thought I hit the snake…but perhaps it just jumped a couple of times.  Then it disappeared.  Laurel (my wife) was concerned about it, but I assured her that the snake wouldn’t come back during the night to bother the dogs.  As it turns out, I was wrong. 

We all passed a fairly sleepless night and every time the dogs got up to go outside, I listened…but heard nothing.  Nothing, that is, until about 5:30 a.m. when Casper went outside and I heard the very distinct sound that I’d heard the night before.  I raced out to the patio door, but before I got there, I heard Casper yelp.  As soon as it hit the door, I looked out and there was Casper, by then about 10 feet from the rattler that had curled up next to some flower pots on the deck.  I got him inside, but the snake was laying on concrete so I couldn’t shoot it with the rifle or shotgun for fear of ricochet.  I shut the dog door again to keep Casper and Rainie both inside, and that’s when I saw Casper bleeding from the nose.  He’d been bitten.  We hurried him to the emergency vet where they began anti-venom and we drove home, leaving him behind. 

When we got inside, we were stunned to see that Rainie had also been bitten and her snout was swelling.  We took her to the vet in town for treatment.  As of this writing, both dogs are still at the vet’s, in stable condition and expected to recover…we’re still praying about that at this moment.

This episode taught me a couple of things:

FIRST: Even a little snake can be horrifying deadly.  This wasn’t a large rattler by any means, but it is the little ones that are the most deadly because they are easily frightened and they’ve not learned to control their venomous injections – so they shoot the venom with, dare I say, venom!  A small snake can give you a bigger, more deadly dose of venom than a larger one would.  I would suppose that when Eve saw Satan, the serpent, in the garden, she wasn’t too alarmed.  I doubt that he looked like a hulking, menacing anaconda with fangs dripping with poison.  He probably presented himself in a beautiful, innocent, small looking form – she certainly didn’t seem to be alarmed by his appearance.  A little bit of Satan’s influence in our lives can destroy or disfigure.  It is often the seemingly innocent flirtation with something sinful that explodes into a full-blown affair, a pattern of theft, hatred, prejudice, etc.  Once the poison is in, it’s very hard to get it out.  And it always leaves a mark and causes great pain and distress.

SECOND: When you see something deadly, you better take deadly action yourself rather than playing around with it in a non-lethal fashion.  I was so wrong to be more worried about the possible noise of the shotgun going off and disturbing the neighbors than I was about the potentially deadly snake that was virtually on the doorstep.  Satan is out to KILL you…don’t be fooled.  Don’t think that just because you might have sent him packing the last time that he’ll stay gone.  He’ll be back.  He’ll be ruthless and he’ll be deadly…if you don’t cut his head off when you have the chance.  Don’t mess around with deadly things like sin in your life.  Kill it…NOW…before it might kill something you love!!!!

It looks at this time like our dogs will survive, yet they are paying a price for my reticence to kill the snake when I had a chance.  Don’t let your family or soul pay for your reluctance to take definitive action against the things that entice you!

PRAYER:  We need to be much more alert and savvy to Satan and his whereabouts in our lives, Lord!  Help us to be able to see him and recognize his poison early and to take effective action by the application of Your Spirit.  Lord, kill the sin-lust that rages in our heart and keep us pure and holy in Your eyes.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

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DayBreaks for 8/02/19 – Toleration of Pests

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DayBreaks for 08/02/19: Toleration of Pests

From the DayBreaks archive, July 2019:

Pests—bugs and rodents—even the thought of them makes our skin crawl.  It’s a fact that pests find their way into everyone’s home at one time or another. The question is, do we hate them enough to do what it takes to get rid of them?  One survey says that the answer to that question depends on what sort of pest it is.  Researchers have found that people will dish out their hard-earned money for an exterminator (meaning they are really serious about getting results) when the following pests are in their home:

Twenty-four percent of adults will pay an exterminator to kill spiders.

Roughly the same number, 27 percent, will pay to annihilate ants.

With the next pest the percentage jumps to just over half, as 56 percent will pay to banish bedbugs.

The same percentage, 56 percent, will pay to get rid of rodents. (That’s mice and rats.  And some people keep these things as pets!!!)

Fifty-eight percent will pay to kill cockroaches.  (Only 58%?!?!?!?  What’s wrong with the other 42%!!!!!!) 

And then there’s a big jump in the number when we talk about termites.  Eighty-seven percent of adults—that’s 9 out of 10—will pay to terminate termites.

How telling it is that with the exception for termites, almost half of adults will live with some very unpleasant pests rather than pay a professional to get rid of the bugs and rodents.  This survey also showed that many people are willing to endure a certain kind of pest, but not others.  (Data from Anne R. Carey and Keith Simmons, “Calling the Exterminators: Critters that bug us most,” USA Today Snapshots (May 22-25), 1A; based on survey of 1,253 adults by Global Strategy Group for Orkin)

Spiritually, things aren’t much different.  Many people are willing to live—or feel they have to live—with spiritual ants, spiritual spiders, spiritual bedbugs, spiritual cockroaches, spiritual mice, spiritual rats, or spiritual termites. Some sins we tolerate in ourselves; others we won’t.  What I may tolerate you may not, but what you tolerate I won’t.  We have grown comfortable with our own pests and have learned to co-exist with them. 

That, however, is not what God wants us to do.  For if you live according to the sinful nature, you will die; but if by the Spirit you put to death the misdeeds of the body, you will live…  Romans 8:13 (NIV)

Have you grown too comfortable with the pests in your spiritual house?  Let’s stop resisting the Spirit who wants to exterminate those pests and cooperate with Him!

PRAYER:  May Your Spirit have His full and complete work in us to eliminate the misdeeds of our bodies.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 7/23/19 – In Green Pastures

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DayBreaks for 07/23/19: In Green Pastures

From the DayBreaks archives, July 2009:

Psalm 23:2 – He makes me lie down in green pastures.

Such a simple statement.  So hard to do.  And there is much behind this simple statement from the quill of King David, who knew exactly what he was saying because of his own shepherding experiences.

In the area where David lived and tended sheep, green pastures don’t just appear normally or naturally.  It is a hot, dry, desert area.  The only way that green pastures exist in such a place is because the shepherd has labored to create a green pasture.  The shepherd would tear out the rocks that might harm the sheep, he would clear away the brush and burn it.  He would dig deep into the earth to create a well and would use the water to irrigate the plot of ground where he planted grass seed.  Finally, when a pasture had been created, he would bring the sheep there to find rest. 

Here’s what David could have said, “He makes me to lie down in His finished work.”  In Christ, that takes on an entirely new meaning.  He is the Great Shepherd who leads all of God’s flock into His finished work.  It is a special place where we find rest from our sin, guilt, shame, fear.  It is made possible only by His completed work on the cross.

Are you finding your rest in the finished work of the Shepherd, or are you still struggling to do the work yourself?

PRAYER: We can never repay You, our Shepherd, for all that You have done for us!  May we rest completely in what Jesus has accomplished and provided for us.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 6/24/19 – Under His Wings

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DayBreaks for 06/24/09: Under His Wings

From the DayBreaks archives, June 2009:

He will cover you with his feathers and under his wings you will find refuge. – (Ps. 91:4)

You may have seen this, but the story is worth repeating. National Geographic several years ago provided a penetrating picture of God’s wings by describing a forest fire in Yellowstone. After the fire, rangers began their trek up a mountain to assess the inferno’s damage. One ranger found a bird literally petrified in ashes, perched statuesquely on the ground at the base of a tree. Somewhat sickened by the eerie sight, he knocked over the bird with a stick. When he struck it, three tiny chicks scurried from under their mother’s wings.

The loving mother, keenly aware of impending disaster, had herded her offspring to the base of the tree and had gathered them under her wings, perhaps instinctively knowing that the toxic smoke would rise. She could have flown to safety but had refused to abandon her little ones. When the blaze had arrived and the heat had scorched her small body, the mother remained steadfast.

The obvious lesson from this story is how the mother was willing to give her life to protect her precious little ones. As long as they stayed under the refuge of her wings, close to her beating heart, they were safe. But if they had ventured out, death would have been certain. As long as we stay close to God (under His protection), we are safe. But the moment we leave His loving embrace, we are fair game for all the terror that is in the world.

I couldn’t help but think of Luke 13:34 when I read this story: O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, but you were not willing! Jesus probably spoke these words from the road through Gethsemane as he approached Jerusalem for the crucial event in his life: the crucifixion.

His words are poignant for several reasons:

FIRST: God’s heart is on display. We must never forget the pain that God feels over humanity gone wrong and how it touches and evokes His love. Rather than shrug His shoulders and turn away, God’s reaction is to reach out to save us!

SECOND: Jesus described Jerusalem as the place where prophets were killed. He wasn’t crying out about the righteous in the city and inviting them to run to him for shelter. He was seeking the losers, the killers, the murderers of prophets and even those who were to soon scourge, beat, spit upon and crucify himself. In his love, he wanted to save even them.

What is your response to this one who offers you the safety of His protection? If you understand what He has done for you, it MUST make a difference in your life. Has it?

Prayer: For Your protection this day, we plead.  Hold us close to Your sheltering wings in safety and peace.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 6/21/19 – The Certain Reality of Love

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DayBreaks for 06/21/09: The Certain Reality of Love

From the DayBreaks archives, June 2009:

They say that only death and taxes are certain.  Well, there is some truth to that, but it’s not the whole truth.  There are other things that are certain, too, whether everyone wants to admit them or not: God’s Word is sure and certain, Judgment Day is real and will certainly happen, God’s promises are certain.  I’m sure that there are other things that are certain (they all have to do with God in some way or form – except for taxes, that is!)  What has struck me recently (probably given the episode with Casper that I described in yesterday’s DayBreaks) is the certainty that if you love something, love will break your heart.

As I held Casper and watched him go limp in my arms and his eyes dilate, my heart was breaking.  Why?  This was only a dog, after all.  But I love this scamp of a dog with all my heart.  And it hurt to think I was going to hold him as he died and that he would be gone.  I pleaded with him to come back, to not go away.  Perhaps the reason he came back wasn’t because of my CPR, but because God heard my desperate plea not to take Casper away while he’s still such a young dog.

If you love another human, you better believe there will be hurt and pain and heartbreak.  Vast loads of it.  Cascading mountains of it.  Not because we set out to hurt those we love – we just do it anyway through our thoughtlessness, our selfishness, our busted human nature.  On the day I promised Laurel that I would love, honor and cherish her until death do us part, do you think for one moment that I ever intended to cause her so much pain in the years we’ve been married?  Never!  But the truth remains that I’ve caused her pain, my children pain, my friends pain, my co-workers pain…and my God pain.

I have sometimes wondered why God created love knowing it would be so painful.  Eventually I came to the point of view that God didn’t actually create love because love existed before He created anything.  It existed in His very own nature, and in the relationship between the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.  So God didn’t have to create love – it always has been because He always has been.  Perhaps that is also true of faith and hope, given the fact that Paul said that long after tongues and other things have passed away, three things will remain: faith, hope and love – with love being the greatest.  All of those things, I believe, are as eternal as God Himself because they find their Source in Him.  He is faithful, He hopes for His creation (including us), and He loves all He has made. 

Nonetheless, as I contemplated the certainty of a broken heart because of love, I was drawn once more to the cross and the broken heart of God over our waywardness.  If we feel pain so much over the possible loss of a dog, how much more does God feel pain as a result of things we, the objects of His love, do?  Perhaps His pain over our sin is as infinite as His love.

Prayer: Lord, I am so sorry for all the pain I have caused You – the One who loves me more than anyone or anything else could possibly love me.  Forgive me!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

 

DayBreaks for 6/20/19 – Receiving a Death Sentence

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DayBreaks for 06/20/09: Receiving a Death Sentence

From the DayBreaks archives, June 2009:

I always find video clips of court sessions where the defendant receives a death sentence interesting.  It is the expression, or lack thereof, on the face of the defendant that interests me.  Sometimes there is no reaction, sometimes they are stunned, at other times they have a very strong physical reaction.  I have often wondered how it must feel to them at that moment when the sentence is read. 

Last week, my beloved boxer, Casper had a close call.  We were going out for our daily walk to the mailbox to get the bills and junk mail.  We’d barely walked out of the garage and he collapsed and struggled to get back up.  After a few seconds that seemed like hours, he gave up struggling and lay in my arms.  I felt for his heartbeat and could feel nothing.  He stopped breathing.  I was at first puzzled, hinking perhaps he’d hurt his hind leg, but then the reality hit me: injured legs don’t stop hearts or breathing.  And my worst fear came to mind: that Casper, like the last boxer I had before him, had dilated cardiomyopathy (an enlarged heart).  It is a relatively common problem in boxers and it had taken Ramses’ life when he was just 5 years old.  All I could think to do with Casper was hold him, talk to and pet him, and then it hit me: do CPR and see if you can get his heart beating and lungs working again.  So, I thumped him on the ribcage a few times, gave him a few breaths of air, and (praise God!) he came back.  Today, you’d never know anything happened by looking at him or watching him.

We took him to the vet who ran tests. I expected to hear the worst – to hear a death sentence pronounced on my beloved dog: “Casper has dilated cardiomyopathy.”  But instead, the vet said that the heart looked good, the EKG was perfectly normal.  So, the cause of the collapse remains a mystery.  It made me think, however, about death sentences.

It was the apostle Paul who referred to the sentence of death in 2 Cor. 1:9-10 (NIV): Indeed, in our hearts we felt the sentence of death. But this happened that we might not rely on ourselves but on God, who raises the dead. He has delivered us from such a deadly peril, and he will deliver us. On him we have set our hope that he will continue to deliver us…” 

In context, Paul is describing the sufferings they endured in order to preach the gospel.  I believe that when we were born, we all received a sentence of death due to our sin nature.  If you are born a human, you are born with that sentence hanging over your head.  You can’t avoid it by having your parents sign some kind of waiver.  The only way to avoid the death sentence is to be given a full and complete pardon by the Judge.  As Paul put it, we have been given the sentence of death so that we will rely on God rather than our own wiles and cleverness or our ability to excuse or argue that we’re not guilty of sin.  God has pronounced sentence: The soul that sins shall die and The wages of sin is death.

The problem is that we often fail to remember that we are under a death sentence until Christ gives us the reprieve and grants us real life.  Casper will die someday.  I will die someday.  But by God’s incredible grace, I shall live again.

Prayer: Father, death is such an enemy.  You have told us that the wages of sin is death, but the free gift You offer us is life through Christ Jesus.  May we consciously live in the awareness that all that is in this created world is passing away, including our physical bodies, and that we need the breath of Life more than we could ever imagine.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

DayBreaks for 2/8/19 – The Impala Problem

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DayBreaks for 2/08/2019: The Impala Problem

One of the few creatures on earth that could out-jump Michael Jordan is the Impala. This is an African deer that possesses supercharged spring. It has a vertical leap of over 10 feet and can broad jump over 30 feet. You would think that the zoos of the world would find it impossible to keep such an animal enclosed. Not so! It’s rather easy. Because the experts discovered something about the Impala. It will not jump unless it can see where it is going to land. Therefore, a solid wall even 6 feet tall is a sufficient enclosure.

Lots of Christians (perhaps all of us at times) have the Impala problem. We won’t take a leap in faith unless they have all the answers in advance about where the leap will take them and whether or not we’ll land safely. But God is looking for some bold believers who, even in the face of the unknown, will leap when the Spirit says leap, will fly when the Spirit says fly, will launch when the Spirit says launch, all to the glory of the Lord.

Are you being challenged right now to take a leap of faith even though you can’t see how it could possibly make sense or work out for good? Trust the Lord and leap!

Jeremiah 29:11 (NLT2) – “For I know the plans I have for you,” says the LORD. “They are plans for good and not for disaster, to give you a future and a hope.

PRAYER: Lord, may our faith in you be based on your integrity and not on whether or not we can see the end of each choice along the way. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright by 2019 by Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>