DayBreaks for 5/25/17 – The Loudest Noise Ever

DayBreaks for 5/25/17: The Loudest Noise Ever

Yesterday I wrote about Jesus’ triumphant cry from the cross, “It is finished!” Today I want to think about sound again, but in a bit different vein.

I love trivia and interesting facts. I even post tidbits of information on my photography blog. So, when I was recently musing about the loudest sound ever recorded, I “googled” it. Here are one item that many claim is the loudest noise ever on earth:

On August 27, 1883, the earth made a noise unlike anything since. On that date, on the island of Krakatoa, a volcano erupted violently. It threw rock and ash 17 miles into the atmosphere (reported by a geologist who witnessed the eruption), created a tsunami 100 feet high, and the noise was heard audibly over a mass equivalent to 1/13th of the entire world. Another way to put it is this: it was heard by people 3000 miles away! A British ship captain who was 40 miles from the volcano when it blew reported that the noise was so loud that over half of his crew had their eardrums ruptured by the volume of the sound. He wrote, “My last thoughts are with my dear wife. I am convinced that the Day of Judgment has come.” No wonder he felt that way – the sound is believed to have been equivalent to 100,000 hydrogen bombs exploding simultaneously.

As if that wasn’t enough, there comes a point at which a loud sound no longer travels “through” air – it literally “pushes” the air ahead of it. Such sound is not measured in decibel levels (though the decibel level 100 miles from the eruption registered 172 – 85 decibels can cause hearing loss and the pain threshold is around 120 decibels), but in pressure waves. The pressure wave from the eruption circled the world four times in each direction. For the next five days after the eruption, the pressure around the world spiked every 34 hours like clockwork as the pressure waves circled the earth over and over. Each city actually experienced as many as seven spikes because the sound came from both directions. The pressure wave was so great that even the waves as far away as San Francisco grew as a result – and then subsided as each spike passed. It was so great that it became known as the “great air-wave”. (If you want to get a sense for what a small pressure wave is like, watch this – just bear in mind that this is miniscule compared to Krakatoa’s eruption – and the boat was only 2.7 miles from the volcano in the video.)

As I was listening to the song, O Praise the Name (Anastasis) from Hillsong (link here), I was struck by a couple lines that described the resurrection of Jesus thusly:

Then on the third at break of dawn
The Son of heaven rose again
O trampled death where is your sting?
The angels roar for Christ the King
.

It dawned on me that though the loudest noise ever recorded on earth may have been Krakatoa, the loudest noise in the universe must surely have been the roar the angels made when they realized that Christ had arisen! What a contrast it must have been to the stunned silence when they witnessed God’s Son die! Is it any wonder that they roared when he came back to life with the defeat of death firmly in his grasp?

I doubt that they’ve stopped roaring yet.

PRAYER: Father, how I long to hear the roar of praise for Jesus pouring from the mouths of the angels, and to join my own praise to that sound that will swell and grow forever and ever! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2017 by Galen Dalrymple.

 

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