DayBreaks for 5/29/17: Big Things With Small, Still Voices

DayBreaks for 5/29/17: Big Things With Small, Still Voices

From the DayBreaks archive, May 2007:

Job 38:4-7 (NIV) – Where were you when I laid the earth’s foundation? Tell me, if you understand. Who marked off its dimensions? Surely you know! Who stretched a measuring line across it?  On what were its footings set, or who laid its cornerstone–while the morning stars sang together and all the angels shouted for joy?

Psalms 19:1-2 (NIV) – The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands.  Day after day they pour forth speech; night after night they display knowledge.

From The Scrivener blog by Doug Dalrymple, 4/20/07:

“Quite literally, as it turns out – the sun is singing: snagging orchestra seats for this solar symphony would be fruitless, however, as the frequency of the sound waves is below the human hearing threshold. While humans can make out sounds between 20 and 20,000 hertz, the solar sound waves are on the order of milli-hertz—a thousandth of a hertz.”

We know that whales sing and birds sing, and well, even some of us humans try to sing with varying degrees of success.  Dogs bark, cats meow, rivers roar and even the heavenly objects, so Scripture says, “sang together and all the angels shouted for joy.” 

When did all this happen?  We might be tempted to think that it happened before the fall of Satan and the realization of evil in the created universe.  After all, wouldn’t it make sense that God’s glorious creation would praise him?  Should we be so arrogant to think that only humans and angels can do so?  It may be true that they sang for joy at the creation and before the fall, for we’re also told through the word that the entire creation now groans and travails in pain, awaiting deliverance that will some day surely come!

But in the meantime, if we’re quiet enough for long enough, you’ll still hear singing.  You’ll hear it with your ears as the animals, wind and sea sing, you’ll hear it with your heart as you look up at the starry canvas on a warm summer night.  And, for those who have ears to hear, we can hear it in the sub-human range of the song of the sun and other stars that sang in the very beginning. 

It’s interesting that something as huge as the sun has such a small voice.  We’d expect it to be huge – a mighty roar as the gasses combust and the flares soar.  But it is a sound too low for us to even hear!  And, as I think about it, perhaps that’s how it really should be anyway.  The voice of God on the mountain was so mighty that people feared Him and fled.  But that’s not his only voice: he also spoke in a whisper to Samuel as a young boy, and in my own personal favorite – he spoke to Elijah in a “still small voice”, that literally translated is something like the sound of falling snow.  As Doug put it: “There’s just something marvelous about big, big things with still, small voices.”

When we were little, our dads were big, but when they pulled us close in their powerful arms and we heard the song, “I love you!” come pouring from their lips, it was marvelous.  And now, with my earthly father gone some 20 years, I’m enthralled when I hear God’s voice, through Jesus, saying, “I love you, son.  I’m so proud of you.  I’ll never let you down!  You’re safe here with Me.”

Big Things with small voices, indeed!

PRAYER: Thank you, Lord, for the music of the spheres and for the song of love that You sing to us!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2017 by Galen Dalrymple.

 

DayBreaks for 5/26/17 – A Proof of the Truth of Love

DayBreaks for 5/26/17: A Proof of the Truth of Love

From the DayBreaks archive, May 2007:

Tears.  Sorrow.  Grief.  Three words that we hope don’t come anywhere near us, for when they do they are always unwelcome visitors.  Would that life were always full of joy, happiness and laughter!  That is, after all, how God intended for life to be, and how it will someday again be for those who love Him! 

In the meantime, we are awaiting that revealing and dawning.  And as the ocean is full of water, so our lives are full of tears.  It doesn’t take much for me to cry.  I am sometimes embarrassed by my readiness to cry, wishing that I were more stoic, that perhaps things didn’t affect me as much.  Those are usually times when I am in a public situation, sometimes in the pulpit, or at the beside of a person in great pain and facing death. 

What can you say to someone who is crushed, broken hearted by loss or some great sorrow?  I know I struggle to find words.  They do, too.  They may be crying, and yet they still seem to be able to say, “I’m sorry for crying.”  I usually am quick to assure them that tears are not bad.  Jesus cried.  And I tell them that tears are a part of the language of love, for if we did not love, we would not weep with loss.

I found it interesting that my oldest son, Doug, was reflecting on this the other day in his blog, when he wrote: “Perhaps sorrow like this can be a kind of gift, too.  It is at least proof of the truth of love, and hope is never far from love.” (Doug Dalrymple, 5/10/07, The Scrivener)

The sorrow that produces weeping is a gift, for it reveals what is in our hearts, and if nothing else, surely it must be proof of the truth of a love that may have even gone unexpressed in happier times. 

Let your tears flow when you need to cry.  They are part of God’s heart, too.

PRAYER:  Lord, may we join in the weeping that comes from your heart for this broken and bloody world of darkness and loss.  May we weep unashamedly because of the love that you put into our hearts for You and those around us.  And may we also weep for our brokenness.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2017 by Galen Dalrymple.

 

DayBreaks for 5/25/17 – The Loudest Noise Ever

DayBreaks for 5/25/17: The Loudest Noise Ever

Yesterday I wrote about Jesus’ triumphant cry from the cross, “It is finished!” Today I want to think about sound again, but in a bit different vein.

I love trivia and interesting facts. I even post tidbits of information on my photography blog. So, when I was recently musing about the loudest sound ever recorded, I “googled” it. Here are one item that many claim is the loudest noise ever on earth:

On August 27, 1883, the earth made a noise unlike anything since. On that date, on the island of Krakatoa, a volcano erupted violently. It threw rock and ash 17 miles into the atmosphere (reported by a geologist who witnessed the eruption), created a tsunami 100 feet high, and the noise was heard audibly over a mass equivalent to 1/13th of the entire world. Another way to put it is this: it was heard by people 3000 miles away! A British ship captain who was 40 miles from the volcano when it blew reported that the noise was so loud that over half of his crew had their eardrums ruptured by the volume of the sound. He wrote, “My last thoughts are with my dear wife. I am convinced that the Day of Judgment has come.” No wonder he felt that way – the sound is believed to have been equivalent to 100,000 hydrogen bombs exploding simultaneously.

As if that wasn’t enough, there comes a point at which a loud sound no longer travels “through” air – it literally “pushes” the air ahead of it. Such sound is not measured in decibel levels (though the decibel level 100 miles from the eruption registered 172 – 85 decibels can cause hearing loss and the pain threshold is around 120 decibels), but in pressure waves. The pressure wave from the eruption circled the world four times in each direction. For the next five days after the eruption, the pressure around the world spiked every 34 hours like clockwork as the pressure waves circled the earth over and over. Each city actually experienced as many as seven spikes because the sound came from both directions. The pressure wave was so great that even the waves as far away as San Francisco grew as a result – and then subsided as each spike passed. It was so great that it became known as the “great air-wave”. (If you want to get a sense for what a small pressure wave is like, watch this – just bear in mind that this is miniscule compared to Krakatoa’s eruption – and the boat was only 2.7 miles from the volcano in the video.)

As I was listening to the song, O Praise the Name (Anastasis) from Hillsong (link here), I was struck by a couple lines that described the resurrection of Jesus thusly:

Then on the third at break of dawn
The Son of heaven rose again
O trampled death where is your sting?
The angels roar for Christ the King
.

It dawned on me that though the loudest noise ever recorded on earth may have been Krakatoa, the loudest noise in the universe must surely have been the roar the angels made when they realized that Christ had arisen! What a contrast it must have been to the stunned silence when they witnessed God’s Son die! Is it any wonder that they roared when he came back to life with the defeat of death firmly in his grasp?

I doubt that they’ve stopped roaring yet.

PRAYER: Father, how I long to hear the roar of praise for Jesus pouring from the mouths of the angels, and to join my own praise to that sound that will swell and grow forever and ever! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2017 by Galen Dalrymple.

 

DayBreaks for 5/24/17 – The Shout of Victory!

DayBreaks for 5/24/17: The Shout of Victory

John 19:30 (NIV) – When he had received the drink, Jesus said, “It is finished.” With that, he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.

The final words of Jesus from the cross have often been misconstrued.  Some movies have pictured Christ, with uplifted eyes, croaking out softly, resignedly, “It is finished” and then bowing his head and dying.  I don’t believe that is an accurate picture at all, and here’s why: when we compare the four gospels we find a very interesting thing. The other three do not tell us that Jesus said, “It is finished.” But what they do tell us that he died with a great shout upon his lips.  John doesn’t speak of a great shout, but instead tells us that Jesus’ very last words were, “It is finished.”  We can safely conclude that the great shout and the words “It is finished,” are one and the same thing.  In Greek, “It is finished” is one word — tetelestai — and that’s what Jesus shouted.  It was no meek or resignedly defeated word that he spoke.  He didn’t say, “It is finished,” in weary defeat; he shouted it out just like a person shouts for joy because the victory is won!  He seemed to be broken on the Cross, but he was NOT!  He was victorious on the cross!
Just in case you think I might be wrong, there’s another strong clue that makes this concept even more certain.  John says that Jesus bowed his head and gave up his spirit. The word that John uses is the word that was often used to describe someone setting their head back upon a pillow and entering into rest.  For Jesus the strife was over and the battle was won; and even on the Cross he knew the joy of victory and the well-deserved rest of one who has completed his task and can lean back, content and at peace.

What a wonderful picture – not of a quiet, broken Jesus on the cross, but of one who knows that it is finished, that it has been finished well, that it will never have to be repeated again.  The price for my sin has ALL been paid!

Do you believe that? That everything that it took for you to be saved and forgiven is finished? That there’s nothing more that you can add to make it more sure? That there’s nothing more that God needs to do for it to be true? That you, too, can rest your head knowing that it is all finished? Maybe the next time we get discouraged in our walk and relationship with Jesus, we would do well to shout out, “It is finished!”

PRAYER:  Will we ever really grasp the victory that was won on Your cross, Lord?  We hang our heads in shame that you had to pay such a price for us, yet we lift our eyes to you in gratitude and wonder for your love.  May we echo your words, “It is finished!” regarding our sinfulness.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2017 by Galen Dalrymple.

 

DayBreaks for 5/23/17 – The Face of Everyman

DayBreaks for 5/23/17: The Face of Everyman

John 19:33-37 (NIV) But when they came to Jesus and found that he was already dead, they did not break his legs.  Instead, one of the soldiers pierced Jesus’ side with a spear, bringing a sudden flow of blood and water.  The man who saw it has given testimony, and his testimony is true. He knows that he tells the truth, and he testifies so that you also may believe.  These things happened so that the scripture would be fulfilled: “Not one of his bones will be broken,” and, as another scripture says, “They will look on the one they have pierced.”

And so the soldiers and the on-lookers witnessed the piercing of Jesus with the spear.  It is true that they did not break Jesus’ legs.  The Passover lamb from the OT had to be perfect – without any flaw.  In the preparation of the lamb for the sacrifice, the lamb was not to be mutilated any more than was absolutely necessary for the sacrifice.  It was offered to God and was to be protected from any unnecessary mutilation.  Of course, that was a foreshadowing of Christ – and the ancient passages that had been prophecies about the sacrifice of the Messiah included one that said not a bone of his would be broken.  What’s the point?  Simply this: we must remember that God in heaven, the eternal Father and lover of His only begotten Son, could apparently tolerate only so much…he would not permit his Son to be unnecessarily mutilated – nothing more than was necessary.  We might argue and think that Christ was horribly mutilated by the scourging, the beating, by bearing his cross from the city to the hill of Calvary, by the nails and crown of thorns, and by the spear in his side.  In fact, the great prophet Isaiah had written in Isaiah 52:14 (NLT) – “Many were amazed when they saw him—beaten and bloodied, so disfigured one would scarcely know he was a person.” 

This, too, was a prophecy about the suffering the Messiah would endure.  So how can we look at this passage from Isaiah which says Jesus was so badly mauled in his suffering and crucifixion that he was hardly recognizable as a man and how can we reconcile that with the words that say that the lamb was not to be mutilated any more than was absolutely necessary?  There’s only one way that I can think of, and it horrifies me: ALL that Jesus suffered on the cross and leading up to it was ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY.  It wasn’t necessary because Jesus deserved it – but because we deserved it.  It wasn’t his own beating that he endured – Isaiah chapter 53 makes it clear that it was our punishment he bore: Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted.  But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed.  Every lash of the whip, every blow of the fist, every moment of pain, every fall of the hammer – every last one of them were absolutely necessary, for God would permit no more.  A couple more thoughts on this passage:

  1. Why was it necessary that Christ should be so beaten and disfigured that he was barely recognizable as a human being? I’m not sure, I can only speculate. But in his death, if he had been recognizable as himself, with his own distinct features still clearly visible, his face would not be that of every man…he would still be someone distinct.  But by having his features nearly wiped off his face, he bore the image of degraded, disfigured Everyman.
  2. The soldiers and lookie-loo’s saw Jesus, the one they had pierced, but we, too shall see him – and when we do, we shall realize that we, too, pierced him. We pierced him on the cross by the sin of our hatred and rebellion to God, we pierce his heart of love every day when we sin against the love of God and His will. And the day will come when we, too, shall lift up our eyes and see the One we pierced.  What we see in return will depend on what we’ve done with Jesus in this life – if we’ve confessed our sinfulness and asked His forgiveness – letting him be the Lord of our life, or on the other hand, if we proudly refuse to bow the knee and ask his forgiveness, we will not be happy to see him.

May I always be reminded that my eyes, too, shall look upon the one that they, and I, have pierced, and that he looks upon me.

PRAYER: Forgive us, Jesus.  We know not what we do.  Thank you for such love, grace and mercy!  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2017 by Galen Dalrymple.

 

DayBreaks for 5/22/17: He Is My All?

 

DayBreaks for 5/22/17: He Is My All?

There is a Christian song that we sing at church sometimes, in fact, we sang it just yesterday, titled All To Us. At the end of each verse are these words, “We believe, You’re all to us” (verses 1 & 2) and then verses 3 & 4 end with, “Jesus You, are all to us.”

We are told that when we sing we are to sing with both the Spirit and the understanding. I wonder how often we really do that. We know so many of the songs by heart that we can sing them in our sleep – and I fear that perhaps we are often sleeping through the words we are singing in worship as a result. It is a very powerful claim to be making that “Jesus, You’re all to us.” How I hope it is true – and I hope we aren’t singing those things mindlessly because God is listening and knows whether it is true or not. The person standing next to you probably can’t tell if it’s true or not, but God knows. Every. Single. Time.

As one of our worship leaders wrote: “When someone or something is our “ALL” or our “EVERYTHING”, it’s obvious to those around us. There’s no mistaking it. They are the topic of our conversations. They occupy much of our mental real estate. Our decisions hinge greatly upon this person or this thing. There is NO doubt when one is impassioned…driven…consumed.

“Now, fill in the blanks:

“I often find myself weaving ______ into my conversations.”

“Countless times a day I realize I’m lost in thought, thinking of ________.”

“When making a decision, I take _____ into account before deciding.”

“How do you fill in the blank: your family, a spouse, children, your job, your to do list? Was it money, status or climbing the ladder of success? Now, place “Christ” into the blanks. What does that look like?”

How did you do with that simple little test? When you make the claim that Jesus is everything to you, that he is all that matters, it should be obvious to everyone around us. Does putting the word “Christ” in those blanks really sound like the real you? Does it ring with truth, or does it reveal to your heart that perhaps He isn’t your all, your everything? Is it just something you sing or say mindlessly?

I realize that we must grow into loving someone or something as time passes. I have found in my own life that the love I had for my wife or children or grandchildren has only grown with the passage of time. Is the same true for my love of Christ? I hope and pray that it is so and that it will be even more true was each new day passes. Until then, perhaps I should be a bit cautious when bragging how much Jesus means to me until my life reflects it a bit more.

PRAYER: Jesus, for all the boastful things I have said about my love and devotion for you, please forgive me. Let it be true that someday I can honestly say that you are my everything. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2017 by Galen Dalrymple.

 

DayBreaks for 5/19/17 – The Truth About Dead People

DayBreaks for 5/19/17: The Truth About Dead People

Colossians 2:13 (NLT) – You were dead because of your sins and because your sinful nature was not yet cut away. Then God made you alive with Christ, for he forgave all our sins.

No matter how many sermons you might hear, no matter how many books about God’s grace that you might have read or may read in the future, we keep coming back to a concept that we have to be “good” in order to get into heaven.

Every time we fall into our “sin trap” – that sin that plagues you year after year – we begin to despair and think that surely, we’ve exhausted the grace of God and benefits of Christ’s blood. I understand that way of thinking perhaps better than most because I was raised thinking that if you committed a sin and didn’t get a chance to ask for forgiveness before you were struck by lightning and killed, then you probably wouldn’t go to heaven. Guilt was huge in my early years of faith.

I invite you, though, to look at the passage today. Read it carefully. Let it sink in. See if you really grasp what it is saying.

Here’s the key: we all have read how we were dead in our sins. That’s not hard for any person of faith to understand. But think about the implications of that statement. Here’s the question: how much can a dead person do? Uh, nothing, right? We could do nothing to make ourselves “alive”…it was an act of God that made us alive with Christ because he forgave not some, but ALL our sins. Past, present, future. Period.

Dead people can do nothing. We are TOTALLY dependent on God for our “life” – for our salvation. Isn’t it great to know that it isn’t dependent on us and how “good” we are!

But can we trust Him? If we can’t trust this Father, who can we trust? And remember Jesus statement that he will not lose even a single one that the Father has given him (made alive) (John 18:9) and that no one can snatch people out of the Father’s hand – not even me.

PRAYER: Thank you for these great assurances, and for the power of Your Word to hold us firm and safe. Thank you for making us alive in Christ! In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Copyright 2017 by Galen Dalrymple.