DayBreaks for 6/30/15 – God and the Kitchen Guy

DayBreaks for 6/30/15: God and the Kitchen Guy

Today’s DayBreaks is from the 2005 DayBreaks archive:

From John Ortberg’s God Is Closer Than You Think: “…a man named Nicholas Herman in the food service industry had had stints in the military and in transportation, and now he was a short-order cook and bottle-washer.  But he became deeply dissatisfied with his life; he worried chronically about himself, even whether or not he was saved.

“One day Nick was looking at a tree, and the same truth struck him that struck the psalmist so long ago: the secret of the life of a tree is that it remains rooted in something other and deeper than itself.  He decided to make his life an experiment in what he called a ‘habitual, silent, secret conversation of the soul with God.’

“He is known today by the new name given to him by his friends: brother Lawrence.  He remained obscure throughout his life.  He never got voted pope.  He never got close to becoming the CEO of his organization.  He stayed in the kitchen.  But the people around him found that rivers of living water flowed out of him that made them want to know God the way he did.  ‘The good brother found God everywhere,’ one of them wrote, ‘as much while he was repairing shoes as while he was praying with the community.’  After Lawrence died, his friends put together a book of his letters and conversations.  It is called Practicing the Presence of God and is thought, apart from the Bible, to be the most widely read book of the last four centuries.  This monastic short-order cook has probably out-sold novelists John Grisham and Tom Clancy and J.K. Rowling put together.”

How great is our hunger and longing for God?  How often do you find yourself being aware of His Presence?  You can find Him wherever you are today – in the kitchen, in the workplace, in the classroom, in the nursery and on the highway.  Know this: wherever you are, He will find you.  Will you find Him?  Do you want to?

Copyright by 2005 Galen C. Dalrymple.  ><}}}”>

© 2015, Galen C. Dalrymple.

To email Galen, click here: E-mail Galen.

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